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Restoration Tips

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   con rod removal posted by: Nick on 2/5/2001 at 11:51:33 AM
I have an rd 200 and at present i am restoring it to it's original condition and i need to replace a con rod. At present i do not know ho to remove it. Could you help? Have you any hints and tips? Please e-mail me back thanks

Nick

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   con rod removal posted by Jeff on 4/13/2001 at 1:56:22 PM
Nick , is that a Yamaha RD200? If so, the crank is pressed together
and must be pressed apart by a competent mechanic ( very tight tolerances).
Then the con rod , bearing and pin can be inspected and replaced if neccessary




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Manta Ray posted by: Morgan Allen on 2/4/2001 at 5:09:52 PM
I have a 1971 schwinn frame that was labeled fastback from the seller. When comparing to other fastbacks the frame is just a little bit bigger on the overall dimensions. Does anybody know the frame specs for a Manta Ray?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Manta Ray posted by jd on 2/8/2001 at 11:01:34 AM
Mantas have 24" wheels. If the 20" wheels are too small then it may be a Manta. There is a good picture of one in the database.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   schwinn kickstand removal posted by: jeff on 1/30/2001 at 1:43:38 PM
any easy way to remove a schwinn kickstand without their special tool? thanx in advance .....jeff

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   schwinn kickstand removal posted by MNSmith on 1/31/2001 at 12:03:39 AM
now?

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   schwinn kickstand removal posted by MNSmith on 1/31/2001 at 12:04:41 AM
There sure is!! Go to the front page of OldRoads.com . Go down the page until
you see the "Links to other Vintage Bicycle Websites." Scroll down that page
until you see Bunch "O" Bikes. That is my web site. Go to my REPAIR AND
RESTORATION TIPS page where you will find instructions with pictures on how to
remove a Schwinn kickstand. If you have any problems, send me an email!

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   schwinn kickstand removal posted by schwinn kid on 2/6/2001 at 10:05:00 PM
there is a tool that is made to do that easy way go to a local bike shop




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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Overhauling Shimano 3-Speed posted by: J Schopf on 1/30/2001 at 7:22:23 AM
I am currently trying to restore an old 3-speed bike, a "light roadster" by Sheldon Brown of Harris Cyclery's definition. The last time I had a 3-speed hub apart was when I was 17, and that was many moons ago. The problem is that instead of the typical English or French hub this one had to be Shimano. To that end I have not been able to find any information on the Net regarding this hub. It appears to be in working order, it freewheels fine, the pawls click, however, the axle feels a little dry when turned. Normally 3-speed hubs are just oiled. What I would like to know is whether there is a procedure for flushing the hub and then re-oiling or if it should be disassembled, inspected, cleaned and reassembled. Regardless of the answer to this question I am also searching for the diagrams for this hub should I encounter others that do require disassembly. I own Barnett's Manual - Third Edition and Sutherlands Handbook for Bicycle Mechanics - Sixth Edition, neither of which contain any information on 3-speed hubs, Shimano or otherwise.

On a secondary note I would also be interested in establishing a little history on the bike as a whole as well. The following is all the information I was able to determine from the bike:

Make: Venture
Model: Classic
Ser no: 120943
Tires: IRC Guaranty Roadster 26x1 3/8 (what type of tires will I be able to replace these with?)
Rims: UKAIRIM 26x1 3/8 w/o - steel
Hubs: front - SIW
rear - Shimano 3-speed
Cog: 18T

The information on the Shimano hub is laid out as follows:

(Logo) SHIMANO CK
3speedHUB
U.S.A. Pat.3021728 G

I thank you for your time in advance and hope to hear from you soon

Many Thanks,

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RESTORATION TIPS - SADDLES:   TIPS ON RECOVERING BANANA SEATS posted by: Eric on 1/29/2001 at 4:15:57 PM
does anyone have any tips on recovering seats?
I'v recovered 1 seat and it is nice and smooth on one side and the other side is not smooth.
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----NEED TIPS ON RECOVERING SEATS----
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thanks, Eric

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - SADDLES:   TIPS ON RECOVERING BANANA SEATS posted by A freind on 1/30/2001 at 9:23:08 AM
How's it going Eric, I hesitated to post this message. This process is better explained with me there showing you. But thats not possible for the moment. This requires much pataints. Here go's. Lets say you didn't throw away your old cover. Your job is getting off to a good start now. Take your new material, with the finish side down. So you will see the under side of the material that will lay face down on your seat pan. Now you will need a magic marker or a blue material chaulk the upolstery guys use. A good pair of sharp sissors. I have done this many times, my choice of cutting tool is a box cutter. Thats up to you. You will need a can of spray adhesive aswell, very important. Brand I use is by 3M 7778, TALL BLACK CAN. Or you can use DURO a cheaper brand. You have to know how to use these products,so listen up carefully. Lay your old material down on your new material. Now with your hands spread your old cover as flat as you can. The reason for this is so you can see with your own eyes how much your going to cut. Now when you are satisfied with what you see, take your time and trace a outline image of your new seat cover. What I do as procaution, I will outline 3/8 of a inch larger than the pattern for insurance. The other reason for doing this is added material like your foam or padding. Use the same thicness that was removed. Natrually your old stuff will be flattened by now. Some times I get lucky and use the original foam. By this time I am very happy with life, right about now. You will come to understand this more as you do it. Now that everything is cut out and measured. Get your spray adhesive, and spray a generous amount on your new seat pattern. What I do is only apply on the seat area only. The reason for this is, you want to make sure your adhesive has dryed or disapated some. You want to work with a tacky service, not freashly apllied wet service. You will get all sticky and your work becomes a dragg. Everything you touch will stick to your hands. So another tip is to keep a little laquer thinner around so you can clean your hands every now and then. You want to center your seat cover, and concintrate on the seat service first. Never mind the sides right now. But make sure you have enough fold under, and eveness on both sides to work with. So when your ready for the sides your a step ahead of the game. Now with a flash time of 5-mins, gone by when adhesive was last applied, take your foam, or if already on your seat pan, with light pressure lay down your new cover and center it evenly. When you are happy with what you see, start to iron with your hands the material down firmly. Do this several times. Now about this time you sould take a break and stand back and check out your work. There is no turning back now. Once you lay it down what you see is what you get. Your sides should be free from the seat pan right now. Break is now over! Now that your mind is clear. You are now ready for your sides now. Take adhesive spray and repeat the earlier process on one side only! Look and keep a sharp eye on what your doing at this time. This is where the fun begins. Now that it is tacky, start to pull from the center to the front to back. This is where a little cussing will vent your added energy. Now start the other side. By now you should have the nose of the seat undone still, and the rear aswell undone. You do those last. By this time your seat is starting to look like something. Check for wrinkles and lumps as you go. Now start with the rear of the seat and spray as needed. Flash time, now go to the nose and do the same. Now get your second pan and try to install it as you go. Donot fold tabs until you are happy with the apearence. The adhesive sprays can be bought at your local auto parts or staples for the GM BRAND 7778. The rest is careful hole making for your seat hardware. If you own a Schwinn seat don't forget your nose and rear plastic linners before material is apllied. Plus your Schwinn tag in back. WASN'T THAT FUN.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - SADDLES:   TIPS ON RECOVERING BANANA SEATS posted by Joel on 2/1/2001 at 1:13:14 PM
Wow, great job Friend.... I have done several this way and it works great. I might add that some small clothspin type clamps (Home Depot has cheap ones) are very helpful for holding the fabric while the glue sets and a hair dryer will help to stretch and soften the fabric, especially if it's cold.

          RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - SADDLES:   TIPS ON RECOVERING BANANA SEATS posted by A freind on 2/2/2001 at 6:19:23 PM
Thanks Joel, I always say, share don't spare it. Any little tech tip of information helps out a whole lot!

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - SADDLES:   TIPS ON RECOVERING BANANA SEATS posted by ROBIN on 2/25/2001 at 12:27:43 PM
ERIC IF YOU USE THICKER FOAM YOU NEED TO DRILL THE INNER PAN HOLE CLOSER TO THE TOP TO ALLOW FOR THE INCREASE THICKNESS OF THE FOAM AND COVERING MATERIAL.THIS IS WHERE YOUR BOLTS GO THROUGH THE SEAT AND INNER PAN. I USE THE SAME SPRAY ADHESIVE BUT ON THE INSIDE OF THE SEAT WHERE THE COVERING MATERIAL FOLDS I USE 3M WEATHER STRIP ADHESIVE. JUST ASK FOR "GORILLA SNOT" ITS THE SAME THING NASCAR USES TO HOLD THE LUGNUTS ON THE WHEELS. THIS SEEMS TO HOLD BETTER WHEN YOU MAKE YOUR FOLDS. I ALSO PUT A SMALL AMOUNT BETWEEN THE FOLDS. ALSO TRY TO CUT THE FOAM SO THAT IT ISN'T BETWEEN THE PAN AND SEAT. THIS WILL MAKE IT EASIER TO FIT THESE PIECES TOGETHER. PRATICE FITTING YOUR COVER AND MAKING THE FOLDS WHERE THE COVER WRAPS UNDER THE SEAT BEFORE YOU PUT ANY ADHESIVE ON. TRY TO SEE HOW THE FACTORY MADE THEIR FOLDS WHEN YOU TAKE A SEAT APART.YOU CAN USE QUARTER INCH UNDER LAYMENT FOAM THAT GOES UNDER CARPET FOUND AT ANY HOME CENTER OR THE FOAM USED ON THE INSIDE OF CAR SEATS.I'VE BEEN STITCHING MY OWN COVERS AND HAVN'T HAD ANY PROBLEMS. THE NICE THING ABOUT THIS FOAM IS, ITS THICKER THAN WHAT CAME ON THESE SEATS WHICH MAKES THEM FEEL BETTER ON THE BACK SIDE.




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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   10" balloon tires for an Irish Mail cart posted by: Nancy on 1/29/2001 at 6:32:38 AM
I'm restoring an early 1900's Irish mail go-cart and can not find 10" x 2 replacement balloon (tubeless) tires. Anyone have any suggestions?? Thx

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Restoring a '57 Hornet Deluxe posted by: Brian Englert on 1/25/2001 at 5:48:37 PM
Getting ready to restore a '57 Hornet Deluxe. Was wondering if anyone had some good detailed photos of this model that they could send to me. Especially when it comes to the two-tone paint schemes on the frame and fenders. Also I need to know what colors were available. If you do not have this information could you lead me to someone who does? I look forward to hearing from you.

Brian Englert
benglert@carolnet.com

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Restoring a '57 Hornet Deluxe posted by Joel on 1/26/2001 at 9:28:36 AM
Suggestions: There are loads of pictures of Hornets on the web. I am constantly copying photos to floppys for future reference. Try looking on EBAY, Bikeicons, here, Nostalgic.net, .... A search will surely find more sites.
Memory Lane and Maple Island Sales will have decals. A template for the rather complicated striping around the head tube can be easily made from the decal they sell. As for the color, does your bike have any original paint left? Maybe under old paint? On the steer tube of the fork? Inside the crank housing? Under the fenders? Are there traces of fender striping that can be measured?




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   LOOKING FOR SOMEONE TO PAINT A S-RAY FOR ME posted by: STEVEN on 1/24/2001 at 8:28:58 PM
IM LOOKING FOR SOMEONE TO PAINT A S-RAY FOR ME AT A REASONABLE PRICE, I LIVE IN MICHIGAN,,,,,,,,

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   LOOKING FOR SOMEONE TO PAINT A S-RAY FOR ME posted by Jon on 1/25/2001 at 6:53:35 PM
In my opinion there are two things govern what constitutes a reasonable price for painting a bike. 1.-What kind of quality you want and 2.-How much preparation you are willing to do. Here is a road map to a good compromise............Take just the frame and fork to an auto machine shop or furniture stripper to have the old finish boiled off.(They may do it on the cheap side because bikes are not their usual line of business and they'll be happy to take your money) You could also have it sand blasted, but it's more time intensive and thus more money. Pickeling and priming can be done with products from any hardware store. Degrease with mild detergent; Phosphoric acid(wire wheel cleaner) wash; then a good water rinse and fast dry; followed by red oxide primer; followed by one or more coats of grey auto primer/sealer with wet sanding between coats(400 grit to start, 600 grit to finish). From this point the final finish will depend on how smooth you can make that primer and how much you are willing to pay the painter. As for the painter; A person who paints bikes for a living is going to cost more bucks than the auto body guy in town. Solicit a few collision shops in your area and ask if there is one who would be willing just to spray the finish coats for you. You have already done the prep work. I hope you find this helpful. Good Luck!

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   LOOKING FOR SOMEONE TO PAINT A S-RAY FOR ME posted by A freind on 1/26/2001 at 9:27:43 AM
Now Jon brought up some very good points on this process. But if I may add that people who deside to sand blast rather than use paint stripper, I find that the sand will pit the frame. In our local area of sand blasting business, they offer sand at different grit, and a better process I like is walnut shell blasting. Yes I said walnut shell blasting. This process only removes the paint, rust. Does not pit the frame. This way you don't have to load up on unnecssary primer to fill the damage that blasting leaves behind. When doing a Schwinn Sting-Ray frame try to restore with the same red oxcide color. Then once properly sanded, follow with the silver base used. Then apply your choice of color finish. Jon is right about the people who are quick to take your money. So do a little talking to the painter and see if he has a profoileo on hand. Make sure its his to. Talk to him on his break rather than him busy working. You get a better responce. Talk bikes with him, if he cuts you short on the subject, and doesn't add a personal expereince about his bike or just wants to talk money. Think about it for a while its your bike, you don't expect him to think its his, right". Drop your fork or show him some color you want him to match to. If you have a spinger, show him some thing on the frame that has factory paint. Beware for body shop color match charging. Yes mo" money. Get him to show you some color left over from a prior job. Once he does that, have him write you out a work order. This way he don't charge you for a whole qaurt of paint. If he does, ask him for your paint back. Now good luck to you!

          RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   LOOKING FOR SOMEONE TO PAINT A S-RAY FOR ME posted by Jon on 1/26/2001 at 7:29:20 PM
You're absolutely right about walnut shell blasting and I agree about finding a painter who shares your interest in bikes and matching the paint. However, I am a little confused about the term 'spinger'. Could you explain further? Thanks.

          RE:RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   LOOKING FOR SOMEONE TO PAINT A S-RAY FOR ME posted by A freind on 1/27/2001 at 2:35:30 PM
Excuse my spelling, I ment to write springer front end.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   reproducing decals posted by: Russell on 1/23/2001 at 7:53:44 PM
I'm currently aquiring a set of raleigh decals, one sheet has the pro, international and comp names and the other has all the stickers needed to do the rest of the frame. I plan on restoring an international and my friend plans to do a pro. Is there any way to reproduce the frame decals to do the pro. Also does anyone know anywhere to get decals for a team track frame from around 1979. Thanx for any help.

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Old sticker removal posted by: Brett on 1/7/2001 at 6:42:49 PM
I have a 1957 metallic blue Schwinn Tiger which I'm currently restoring. The paint is a 8/10 but the "Schwinn" decals are very worn and need to be replaced. Does anyone know how to safely remove the existing decals and old, discolored goo that currently surrounds them? Thank you very much for your help!

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Old sticker removal posted by Steve on 1/9/2001 at 4:35:29 AM
Wow! I just asked the same question, but not being all that familiar with this site, I posted it in the vintage lightweights discussion area (1/7/01). I received 3 excellent replies, and I thank those who responded.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Old sticker removal posted by Brett on 1/9/2001 at 12:24:24 PM
Thanks Steve!! I guess I've got my work cut out for me!! Best of luck getting those stickers off!

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Old sticker removal posted by Dan on 2/2/2001 at 11:05:06 AM
This is not for decals that have become brittle, but for some decals, you can use this old trick. Clean the area real good, then spray clear paint (I always used Schwinn clear spray paint) right over the decal. Wait a half minute or so (dont let it dry) to soak into the decal. Wipe it off. Try this on a nasty old bike to see if it works first, but it usually does - and if the only alternative is strip / paint, then you havent really lost anything!




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   frame style posted by: Rick on 1/7/2001 at 5:15:37 PM
I have a 67 schwinn (originally Rams Horn), Five speed, that I'm repainting, refurbishing, gonna make it a rider, and I've noticed that the frame is different than most other schwinns, the seat stays stop at the the seat tube, and others continue down and connect to the bottom down tube from the head set, and this tube is curved down to the bottom bracket, why is it that there are two different styles of frames, and which one is more rare? if it is at all. Also I don't have the original handle bars or pedals and I have ordered fastback chain guard decals from Pete instead of Rams Horn due to the fact that the bars and pedals are expensive (the ones I've found)and I wasn't really trying to keep it all original. And when I'm done what kind of value am I looking at? thanks

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   frame style posted by Joel on 1/8/2001 at 9:11:59 AM
You have a Ramshorn Fastback. The Fastback frame is a camelback style and is different from cantilever framed Sting Rays. The Ramshorn model was made in 67-68 and (with correct parts) is a little more valuable than a regular Fastback.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   spaceliner posted by: bruce on 1/3/2001 at 9:56:22 PM
I have a set of sears spacliners, how can I date them,are they a bike woth restore eforts. One has the rear light assembly but no lens. Where would one find these parts?Any info would be greatfully recived.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   spaceliner posted by avanti_tomf@yahoo.com on 1/4/2001 at 5:32:21 AM
Sears Spaceliners were made by Murry Bicycles from 1964 to about 1968. There are at least an early version and a late version. The picture database on this site shows the early version. Notice there are standard and deluxe models of each version.

Spaceliners top out at about $325 for perfect bikes on Ebay. A new paint job with custom decals would cost $300, plus replating the chrome and the plastic parts. A total restoration would cost a lot more than $325.
Parts are sometimes on Ebay, but these are more likely found by going to swap meets, which can be looked at as added restoration cost or buying a mini vacation. The front headlight lenses don't exist by themselves. You would probably have to buy a complete bike to get it. Other people have talked about casting new lenses. I hope someone does.

Memory Lane sells new chrome-plated rear reflectors for $15. The small reflectors for the carrier are hard to come by.

The best way to get a bike you'll be proud of may be to part out the bikes you have and buy one that doesn't need restoration.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   brazing using oxy-acetaline-oxy-mapp gas posted by: Jordan on 1/3/2001 at 8:31:28 PM
I was wondering if anybody knows the proper method to brazing on a normal bicycle? I bought one of those rinky dinky canadian tire brazing kits but it didnt work. what should I do?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   brazing using oxy-acetaline-oxy-mapp gas posted by Jon on 1/21/2001 at 4:45:19 PM
I have brazed bike tubes using a small oxy-acetelene torch. From my experience, I have found that small hobby welders are a little too small for joining large tubes, but it can be done with practice. The trick is heating the parts enough to cause the flux and brass rod to flow into the joint without overheating and damaging the steel. (particularily around delicate lugwork) A large blowtorch will heat a larger area more evenly. You have to keep the flame moving around the tube. Also, I have used silver solder and it seems to be easier to work with than the brass rod.(I believe it flows at a slightly lower temperature) This area of restoration is more of an art that requires practice. There is no shortage of instruction on welding. Check the library. Get an old bike to practice on. Good luck.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Mattel Stallion posted by: Jerry Wilson on 12/11/2000 at 12:18:24 AM
I have a mint condition Stallion. I only need to find what kind of tires were on it originally, and was the varoom motor something you added later, or did it come on the bike too? Any other info on these bikes are welcome. I've seen the pictures on this database. Thanks

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   REMOVING CHAIN FROM BIKE posted by: STEVEN on 12/9/2000 at 4:45:27 AM
CAN ANYONE SUGGEST HOW TO REMOVE A CHAIN FROM A FRAME THAT HAS NO MASTER LINK, IM GOING TO GET IT PAINTED SOON, AND DO NOT WANT TO GET IT SCRATCHED,, THANK YOU,,

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   REMOVING CHAIN FROM BIKE posted by Jon on 12/9/2000 at 7:37:51 AM
An inexpensive chain tool probably sells for under $10. It pushes a pin out that holds the outer plates together. Don't remove the pin all the way. Just enough to flex the chain and pull it apart. Be careful putting it back together. Make sure the plates line up before pushing the pin back. When finished, flex the chain at the joint or put the tool on the opposite side of the chain and push the pin back a little to loosen the stiff link. You could also take it to the bike shop and have them remove it for a few bucks.
A good tip: Get to know a local bike shop mechanic without making yourself obnoxious and nine times out of ten he'll do these pesky little jobs on the spot for nothing or next to nothing. Be a regular customer, buy your stuff at his shop whenever possible, and don't bring him the stuff you bought at WalMart or the mail order shop unless you have to (especially if he has the same product sitting on the shelf). You may pay a little more initially, but you're also buying influence.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   REMOVING CHAIN FROM BIKE posted by James Vaughan on 12/9/2000 at 10:51:58 AM
There is something called a lock cutter which snaps chains off

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   REMOVING CHAIN FROM BIKE posted by Jon on 12/9/2000 at 6:06:25 PM
I was assuming that Steven wanted to put the same chain back on when the paint job was finished. Also, if the bike is a derraileur geared bike, it wouldn't have a master link on it.

          RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   REMOVING CHAIN FROM BIKE posted by JOEL on 12/14/2000 at 8:58:49 AM
Steven, you might also consider adding a master link to your chain while it is apart (assuming it is not a deraleur bike).

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