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Restoration Tips

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Specs for Dutch "Old Veteran" 3-speed? posted by: Karen on 9/24/2000 at 4:03:15 PM
I purchased a bike called "Old Veteran" new from a German department store (Kaufhaus)back in 1979. The salesperson told me it was a replica of an old Dutch bike, and indeed I saw many like it in Amsterdam. It is in need of some TLC, having been stored for a long time. I've got a lot of good info from these pages, but I need a little advice on tuning/oiling/adjusting etc. The rear hub is marked "Torpedo Dreigang" and it has 28 inch wheels and rod/coaster brakes. It's lovely, big and black and curvy, with "patent leather" vinyl chain guard and rear fenders. Do I need to take the rear hub apart and clean it? How can I find out more about maintaining this bike? Thanks ...

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Specs for Dutch posted by Grant on 9/27/2000 at 10:58:05 AM
You should never take a 3 speed hub apart. The only service
they require is a little oil now and then. There should be
a little plastic cap in the hub between the spokes. Carefully
pry out the stopper and add 2 or 3 squirts of light motor oil
from an oil can. Some prefer sewing machine oil. I have heard
that 3 in 1 should not be used as it will gum up the mechanism.

Does the front wheel hub have a metal clip that can be moved to
expose an oil hole? If so give it some oil too. If not the hub
can be taken apart and the bearings greased. Same goes for the
crank axle, it has ball bearings but must be taken apart for
service though some old timers had an oil fitting.

The steering head bearings can be taken apart and greased.

None of these things is too difficult if you have the right
tools and know how to use them. Otherwise take it to a good
bike shop. Be careful, there are a lot of so called mechanics
who know nothing about the old models and will ruin your bike
if they get the chance. Also some shops will keep your bike for
2 weeks oil the chain and charge you for a "tune up".

Sheldon Brown's site (see links page on this site) has a lot of
info on the English Raleigh roadsters which are generally similar
to your bike.

If you ever find any sites about vintage German, Dutch, or Canadian
bikes I wish you would let me know.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Restoring pennyfarthing posted by: Charlotte on 9/23/2000 at 10:36:39 AM
I've been given a pennyfarthing as birthday present. Date unknown - but multiple narrow spokes. No tires - would it have had any? No original paint - rusty instead - but solid and sound. Now what? Do I rust cure? Do I repaint- if so what colour were they originally? I'd guess black but does anyone know any better? Do I leave it alone?
Any tips/ suggestions gratefully received.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Restoring pennyfarthing posted by Carl on 9/26/2000 at 5:04:53 AM
It should have some kind of tires.
Those old hi-wheelers go for thousands of $ even in poor shape. Try asking your question in the "Hi-wheeler" topic

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Restoring pennyfarthing posted by Grant on 9/27/2000 at 11:02:05 AM
Don't do any painting or restoration until you talk to a high
wheel bike expert. You can ruin the originality of a valuable
antique and reduce its money value by hundreds of dollars, possibly
more.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Restoring pennyfarthing posted by Teun on 12/12/2000 at 4:35:46 AM
Great birthday present.
Tires: measure the rim - how wide is it? this will give you an idea of the width of tire needed. then get in touch with either The Wheelmen or with (re)sellers of Mesichek bicycles - they can suply new ones. remember to indicate the size of the wheel outside edge of rim - outside edge of rim.
rust: sand off as much as you can. then try to find a good car paint shop and tell them your problem - remind them that the wall thickness of your penny is probably no more than 1,7 mm. and that it needs to remain as thick s possible!!! (find R.Howe's book called 'Collecting and restoring antiuqe bicycles' - he gives a good review of the entire process)
Bearings: leave them alone, find someone who knows about these things. These beaerings often differ significantly from the current types and desroying them would be a shame... a watchmaker should know what to do.
spokes: try to take the wheel apaart as faar as possible. use oil (it is impossible to use too much) make sure that the remaining spokes ar still intact. then make the missing ones. rebuild the wheel, try to tension the spokes as little as possible!!
by now you will have encountered several mayor problems. get in touch with me directly - i will help to get them solved.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   NO RESERVE AUCTION EVERYTHING GOES posted by: joe on 9/19/2000 at 6:25:54 PM
I have 300 or so bicycles and parts for auction all NO RESERVE with the lowest opening bids. Balloon Schwinn, J.C. Higgins, Colson, Firestone, Elgin, Roadmaster and many more as well as 20" Krate, early and late Fastbacks, Manta Ray, Screamer, Huffy and many more. NOS parts lights, speedos, generator sets, tires, used schwinn parts. New Departure boxes with contents. Everything goes. For more info please email. Bicycles and parts at give away starting bids every item to be sold with NO RESERVE. Don't miss it. Thank you.

Joe Rapoza

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Raleigh International posted by: Mike Rocchetti on 9/12/2000 at 6:49:27 PM
I have a couple of old Raleigh Internationals (circa 1975) that have been sitting in my shed for the last 15 years getting rusty and dirty. I have decided to restore these bikes. I think I am going to send them to Airglow Painting in Georgia - to be rechromed and repainted, new decals tec.

Both bikes have rusty old clamp-on Campagnolo bottom-bracket derailleur cable guides. I priced replacements for the cable guides - but they cost more than having new cable guides brazed on. So, I think I may send the frames to Wildframe in Atlanta for the brazing, then have the frames shipped to Airglow for the rest of the work.

I am probably going to have Wildframe braze on some water bottle bosses on the down tube, as well as some down-tube shifter bosses.

Any thoughts on how this might affect the value of the frame? I know that collectors are sometimes real fussy about things like this.

I have some pictures of one of the bikes on-line at:

http://www.connel.com/biker/index.html

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   *****Restoration and Painting Services**** posted by: Mary Pfeiffer on 9/8/2000 at 8:04:04 PM
I own Pfeiffer Pframes, a frame painting, frame repair and restoration shop. The business is family owned and was established in 1984. We offer excellent prices and services on the restoration of your beloved frames. Check out our website http://www.pfeifferpframes.com
For more information please contact me personally at the email address listed. References available.

Thanks,
Mary Pfeiffer

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Removing reflective tape. posted by: Don on 9/7/2000 at 4:18:15 PM
I have a 1950 Schwinn that is in really nice original condition.

Someone has placed reflective tape on several parts of the bike. I have seen this on other old bikes.

Is there a way to remove this reflective tape, without destroying the paint that is on the bike?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Removing reflective tape. posted by Steve on 9/13/2000 at 6:24:53 AM
Try warming the tape with a hair dryer. It should soften and lift easier.

Use paint thinner to remove the adhesive that's left.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Removing reflective tape. posted by paul on 10/3/2000 at 10:05:57 AM
I use Goofoff to remove adhesive from painted surfaces. You can find it in most auto part stores pretty cheap. It really comes in handy and doesn't damage paint.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Removing reflective tape. posted by jeff n on 10/19/2000 at 6:23:30 PM
want a cheap remedy to stuck on stuff? adhesive resins are either solvent borne or waterborne. all you have to do is figure which one you have. rub a little spit on the goo and if it starts to rub off, it's waterborne. so, clean it off with water and maybe a little rubbing alcohol (polar solvents). if it gums up and gets ever gooier, it's solvent borne. for solvent borne adhesive resin residue use some charcoal lighter fluid first (this is basically odorless mineral spirits). if that is not strong enough, try good old fashioned cigarette lighter fluid (which is basically VM&P Naptha). don't use anything stronger than this - it will remove almost any decal or sticker goo with a little work, and won't mar thermosetting paints. do not use aromatics like xylene or toluene, and never ever put "lacquer thinner" on anything painted unless you want to repaint it and cuss for hours on end. your friend, the paint chemist from alabama.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Bicycle Swap Meet, Sept, 10, 2000 Boston, MA posted by: joe on 9/6/2000 at 1:44:00 PM
Swap meet Sullivan Square our 9th Year. Directions Interstate 93 North or South 1 mile North of Downtown Boston, Sullivan Square exit around the rotary Under the Bridge. Please email me for more information. Thank you

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RESTORATION TIPS - SADDLES:   Bicycle Swap Meet, Sept, 10, 2000 Boston, MA posted by: joe on 9/6/2000 at 1:44:00 PM
Swap meet Sullivan Square our 9th Year. Directions Interstate 93 North or South 1 mile North of Downtown Boston, Sullivan Square exit around the rotary Under the Bridge. Please email me for more information. Thank you

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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Bicycle Swap Meet, Sept, 10, 2000 Boston, MA posted by: joe on 9/6/2000 at 1:44:00 PM
Swap meet Sullivan Square our 9th Year. Directions Interstate 93 North or South 1 mile North of Downtown Boston, Sullivan Square exit around the rotary Under the Bridge. Please email me for more information. Thank you

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RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Bicycle Swap Meet, Sept, 10, 2000 Boston, MA posted by: joe on 9/6/2000 at 1:44:00 PM
Swap meet Sullivan Square our 9th Year. Directions Interstate 93 North or South 1 mile North of Downtown Boston, Sullivan Square exit around the rotary Under the Bridge. Please email me for more information. Thank you

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Bicycle Swap Meet, Sept, 10, 2000 Boston, MA posted by: joe on 9/6/2000 at 1:44:00 PM
Swap meet Sullivan Square our 9th Year. Directions Interstate 93 North or South 1 mile North of Downtown Boston, Sullivan Square exit around the rotary Under the Bridge. Please email me for more information. Thank you

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   My grandpa's Colson posted by: Eric on 9/5/2000 at 9:56:19 AM
Hi everyone. My grandfather just past away a few weeks back and I discovered he had an old Colson in the attic. My grandmother says he must have ridden it before he started driving -- this makes it circa 1935-40! It's a beauty, still with horn and tank, rear kickstand, and a sweet cherry red underneath the grime. A real beauty, like my grandfather. Anyway, I am a Schwinn lover, but this will be my first go at restoring a Colson, and I haven't been able to find much info on the bikes (aside from the history of the company). I haven't yet discovered the serial number (I've been too anxious to begin repair). But, it looks like the female bullet nose found in this web site's archive. Hard to tell because it's a female bike and in better shape than the one I have.
So, the questions: First, there's what seems to be oxidation or a good cloud of white spray paint all over the frame. I tried scrubbing it lightly, and had good results, but am loosing a little paint along the way. Is there a better way to go about this? Also, how do you guys feel about a copper scrubby (used in the kictchen, do you know the kind?) as opposed to brass wool? I had pretty good results, but some of the chrome is a little spotty?
I took the front wheel off, and took the hub apart. Some of the bearing casings are cracked, but not badly. Replace them or ride? I cleaned them and the bearings themselves are still pretty circular. They still spin the bike wheel.
And, the area I will get lost in is the rear wheel with the coaster brake. Not sure how to take it apart (and for that matter, will I EVER be able to get it back together?). If anyone has an exploded diagram of such a device, I would greatly appreciate it. The same goes for the crank too. Difficult areas for me, such as, how do I get the crank off?
Also, any other tips/advice would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks!

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   My grandpa's Colson posted by Rickey on 9/5/2000 at 2:48:39 PM
Mr.Eric first of all i wish we were your local bike shop! the kitchen steel wool should stay in the kitchen! at your local grocery store you will find a product called supreme steel wool pads no soap it's OO ought very good for chrome! just dont use on painted surfaces.try mineral spirits let soak 5-10 min. buff with terry cloth.make sure you use in well ventilated area!!!!If your not mechanicly inclined do find a bike shop.hope you enjoy your new bike.




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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Strumy-Archer wheel bearings posted by: Robert on 9/5/2000 at 6:53:47 AM
Is it necessary to tear down and pack the "wheel bearings" on the SA 3 speed hubs? Or does the oil in the hub lube those bearings also?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Strumy-Archer wheel bearings posted by Raymond Mong on 9/23/2000 at 11:36:34 AM
i think u mean the whole lots of small ball bearing.That bearing is for the running the the spocket so it wiser to use some grease on it.Lube from hub does little lubricate




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Decals posted by: Ronnie on 9/2/2000 at 7:45:26 AM
I read in an earlier post about receiving decals via .jpg or .gif. How do I get decals for Schwinn? I know Hyper Rays sells them, but I want to make my own.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Decals posted by Maltus on 9/2/2000 at 11:00:35 AM
I print decals of all types for the motion picture industry, as well as fovors for friends. I happen to have a set of Schwinn decals...entire set for a "Spitfire" in my possess ....e-mail me and I'll tell you how to silk screen decalcomanias using a great photo emulsion called, "Nova-Star".
Maltus




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   New Departure hub... posted by: Don on 9/1/2000 at 11:55:44 PM
I recently picked up a 1950 Schwinn girls balloon tire bike.
I was going to use most of its parts on a boys frame that I have, but my daughter fell in love with this bike.(even though she won't be able to ride it for a few years.)
It has a new departure hub and a skip tooth chain.
But the brakes are VERY soft.
I had read in an earlier post that it may just need a good cleaning and regreasing.
How difficult is this? I've never taken apart a coaster brake hub. Is this a job that an average guy can do?

Also, what are your thoughts on tearing apart a really nice original girls bike, just to put the parts on a boys frame?
Keep in mind that a six year old has the final vote.
Thanks, Don.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   New Departure hub... posted by Jon on 9/2/2000 at 5:28:04 AM
A pair of cone wrenches should do it. Take it apart from the cog side. It's not necessary to remove the cog unless you're a purist and it can be difficult if it's a threaded cog. Note the order of disassembly. Remove the locnut and bearing cone with the cone wrenches. Remove small cog side bearing. Unscrew cog/driver assembly. Remove large cog side bearing. Then pull the brake arm assembly out noting the arrangement of brake shoe assembly and clutch. All these parts can be cleaned in mineral spirits(don't use gasoline) and reassembled in reverse order. (tip: for better braking knock the shine off the shoes and inside hub with 320 grit wet/dry sandpaper)If you have any further problems, I may be able to locate an exploded view from an old Schwinn service manual. Email me.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   New Departure hub... posted by MNSmith on 9/2/2000 at 6:12:26 PM
Check Oldroads.com's exploded hub section. There is a cutaway photo of a New D but no exploded photo.

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