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Restoration Tips

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   decals-rivits posted by: aj on 8/26/2000 at 12:57:26 PM
thought this might b of interest,im restoring a jag mk2 memory lane has the correct seat post decal and hyperformance rays will rerivit the fender braces back on for 2 bucks a rivit plus shipping AJ

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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Hawthorn hub posted by: Joe on 8/25/2000 at 4:30:24 PM
Hey gang, I've got an old Hawthorn cruiser with a Hawthorn coaster brake hub. The cog is not held on with a snap ring like Shimano or Bendix hubs. There is a left hand threaded lockring over the cog. My question, is the cog left hand threaded, or is it right hand threaded like track hubs are? Also, is the hub similar to rebuild as the Shimano and Bendix. I've rebuilt them before.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Hawthorn hub posted by Jon on 9/1/2000 at 7:23:58 PM
If you look carefully at the margin of the cog/driver assembly you will see that the cog thread exits the driver thread with a right hand twist. I'm certain that a left hand lockring would not be used to hold a left hand cog.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Raleigh decals posted by: leoanrd brenner on 8/25/2000 at 2:22:54 PM
I am restoring a 1980 Raleigh 753 ten speed and need a few decals.
One being the Raleigh logo (bird's head) that would go on the seat
tube and the Raleigh name written in cursive for the top tube.
These can be in decal form or gif or jpeg. I have reproduced the
753 Reynold's decal and can supply it one if any one needs it.

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RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Chrome vs. Steel posted by: Nat on 8/25/2000 at 8:13:39 AM
The handlebars on my project are really pitted...is it better to keep what chrome I can (which is not much) or just steel-wool it down to the stainless?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Chrome vs. Steel posted by Jon on 9/1/2000 at 7:12:19 PM
Rechroming is a possibility, but expensive. For the collector's sake, leave it alone. You may find a layer of copper under the chrome and it's had to remove by steel wooling.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Coaster Breaks posted by: Bryan on 8/22/2000 at 10:26:09 AM
Hi! I'm a newbee here, but have enjoyed reading the posts and have learned a lot.
I dug up our old 1964 Schwinn Tandem (learned from the serial number page!) that we bought at a yard sale about 15 years ago. We rode it some then but it hasn't seen the light of day for at least 10 years. I brought it out of the basement and the kids (10, 8 and 6) think it is the coolest thing! I'm in the "clean up" process which is going quite well! I bought new tires from the Schwinn dealer but haven't installed them. The old ones still work for now but are quite cracked and look like they could go at any time. I'm trying desparately to save as much original as I can.
My question is on the coaster break. It doesn't work really well. Do you think just taking it apart and cleaning it up will do the trick? Is there any other advice before I tackle this?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Coaster Breaks posted by racerrex on 8/29/2000 at 6:54:47 PM
If the brake worked o.k. before you parked it, a good cleaning and new grease should make a vast improvement. It is a coaster and not a drum, right?




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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   looking for wheels or restoring them posted by: James Swink on 8/20/2000 at 10:04:30 AM
I am looking for wheels for a 1960s Vista by N.I.D.A. tandem and Hikari tandem that I am trying to restore if anyone knows where I can find these it would be much appreciated

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   looking for wheels or restoring them posted by rickey on 9/6/2000 at 4:34:57 PM
I recently restored a rollfast tandem for a coustemer we ordered a new set of wheels from my distributer 105ga spokes new chrome + lots of other goodies !SURE it's not original but it LOOK'S REAL GOOD he's very satisfied if your interested I'll gladly tell you how to get them !! seya

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   looking for wheels or restoring them posted by Fred Appel on 10/19/2000 at 8:22:29 AM
I have a VISTA N.I.D.A. tandem that I am thinking about selling. I purchased it from the original owner who hardly used it. Thought my wife might like it but she doesn't. Color is a deep rust. Condition of bike is excellent. Let me know if you're interested.
Thanks. Fred




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   1901Steffey clip on engine posted by: John on 8/17/2000 at 5:12:41 PM
I am Having a hard time finding any pictures of this clip on engine, does anyone have any information on this engine, or does anyone have one?
John
jonnycola@hotmail.com

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Space age batteries still leak posted by: Tom Findley on 8/16/2000 at 6:54:27 AM
Last week I rode my 1998 Cruiser Deluxe, which I haven't done for a while. I pressed the horn button, and it didn't blow. I took the tank apart, and to my disgust, the high-tech, new-age, $2 EACH Duracell batteries had leaked acid on the inside of the tank and horn unit. The acid turned to crystallized granules. After cleaning with steel wool and chrome polish, I found the acid had not done much damage- 1 spot where it had eaten through the chrome on the inside of the tank, and 1 spot through the cadmium plating on the horn frame.

After cleaning the corrosion off the back of the batteries, the horn worked.

To keep this from happening again, I got some anti-corrosion gel at Pep Boys, and coated the cleaned units with it. This is used on car battery terminals, and neutralizes the acid. I rubbed the gel all over the inside of the tank, and on the horn unit.

I recommend that you do this to any light or horn you have working, and check/clean the batteries once a year. They do last over 2 years, so this is not something to do just when the batteries stop working.

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Where do I start? posted by: paul on 8/14/2000 at 7:35:13 AM
My grandfather recently gave me a 1940ish Schwinn excelsior that he's had for almost 60 years. I want to restore it, but I've never restored a bike before. I want to do it right so as not to take away from the originality of the bike. Does anyone have any tips??? thanks.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Where do I start? posted by Steve on 8/14/2000 at 9:35:32 AM
It's usually best to leave the bike original. It's been said that a bike can be restored a thousand times, but it's only original once!

I've restored plenty of bikes in the past, but now I prefer the original "patina" -- even if slightly worn. It shows the bike's true story. The nicks and scratches in the paint may evoke some fond memory of a long forgotten adventure. The rust shows the decades the machine has survived.

Also, if the bike is not properly restored, it's value is less than if left alone. Usually, bicycle collectors value an original bike more than one that's been restored.

Having said all this, I recommend a good cleaning of the bike First, I disassemble it completly. I derust and clean and polish every nut, bolt and spoke. I save as much of the paint as possible by using with a mixture of WD-40 and rubbing compound. If the painted metal parts are rather rusty, I first rub the surfaces with 000 steel or brass wool soaked in WD-40 (then the rubbing compound).

If there is housepaint, I use a cheap paint remover and wipe off the repaint before it attacks the original finish. Timing is critical here. Work in small patches and take your time. The pin striping is the most difficult to save. Many times I retouch that when I'm done.

Chrome and cad plated parts can be cleaned up with WD-40 and fine brass wool. If the rust is more extensive, it can be removed through electrolisis. Email me for more details.

A bike cleaned up with this method would not have it's originallity taken away. If done properly, it's value would only increase.

Hope this helps.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Where do I start? posted by sam on 8/14/2000 at 7:50:25 PM
I agree with Steve,a good restration cost around $1500 by the time all the crome is replated and the frame pro.painted ,(do the fenders need rolling?)well you get the picture,it's a lot cheeper to clean(really gooood clean)first.Then take a look at your grandaddy bike,you might suprise yourself.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Columbia Kickstand removal???? posted by: robertbox@angelfire.com on 8/14/2000 at 6:51:05 AM
Bought a Columbia singlebar middleweight Sat. Looks very simular to the camelback in listed in the pictures. My question is does anyone know of how to remove the kickstand?
Stand passes through the frame just behind the bottom bracket. There is a circular alloy cover the surrounds the hole on the left side of the frame. Stand comes out of the frame passes thru this alloy circle and then bends down to support bike.Alloy cover possibly threads on but I was looking for some info before I started dissassembly. Any help appreciated.

Thanks

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Broken stem bolt: Part 2 posted by: Al on 8/8/2000 at 9:27:22 PM
Well, I got the neck out of the fork and I can see the wedge, but it's not moving. I wanted to put some penetrating oil in from the bottom, but the fender screw is rusted tight(surprise, surprise). I'm thinking of twisting it off, drilling through the screw, and retapping the hole. Then I might be able to loosen the wedge from the bottom. Any other suggestions? Thanks

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Broken stem bolt: Part 2 posted by MNSmith on 8/9/2000 at 1:49:15 AM
As long as you have the tools to do it, sounds like a solid plan. How is the integrity of the fork tube itself? Rust out? Bulges? Is it worth saving? That screw hole is 1/4-20. I'd say drill first, knock out the wedge, then tap. That way you don't ruin your thread job. Let us know how you make out on part II of the job!

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Broken stem bolt: Part 2 posted by Al on 8/9/2000 at 10:36:09 PM
Finally got the fender screw to snap off and then I drilled it out. Still can't budge the wedge. The tube is bulged where the wedge is stuck. It must be in at an angle and just won't come free. I thought about pounding it further into the tube and then I could get it back together. Let the next guy figure it out. :)

          RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Broken stem bolt: Part 2 posted by Al on 8/10/2000 at 10:07:08 PM
Success at last. It seemed like 1 tap in just the right spot and the wedge fell out. Thanks for the help.

          RE:RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Broken stem bolt: Part 2 posted by MNSmith on 8/10/2000 at 10:09:52 PM
I bet a lot of crap fell out too!




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Restoring 1956 Girl's 26" Cruiser posted by: Banditt on 8/8/2000 at 10:19:29 AM
I am having trouble with the original kickstand on my restoration project 1956 Schwinn bicycle, I'm assuming that after 44 years the bike's internal kickstand parts have worn and the kickstand will not stay up when riding, Is there any way to tighten it or do something that will be a temporary fix until I can replace it?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Restoring 1956 Girl's 26 posted by sam on 8/11/2000 at 6:05:35 PM
Sounds like you got a weak spring,one of those ties would keep it up.(or tape)you might want to remove it,if so go to links to other vintage bicycles web sites,there you will find Bunch"0"Bikes this site tells how to remove the stand.then you might order a kick-stand (Maple Island has them)or get a used one off another bike--sam

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Restoring 1956 Girl's 26 posted by Banditt on 9/11/2000 at 12:41:33 PM
I finally got the kickstand fixed, It turned out to be a worn kickstand pin, and the year is a 1955 not a 1956, My mistake.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   BF Goodrich Crusader posted by: Jones on 8/5/2000 at 11:52:40 PM
I just aquired an old BF Goodrich Crusader, and was about to atempt my first ever bike restoration. I was just wondering what I should do about the logo/number's when i repaint this bike. Thanks.

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Serial number posted by: Jeff Fuller on 8/2/2000 at 3:51:47 PM
I recently aquired a Columbia bike. I see that there is a
serial number list, but I don't know where to find it. Can
someone help me?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Serial number posted by rd on 8/4/2000 at 8:08:13 AM
hit your back button and go to the top or bottom where it says serial number charts. easy as can be.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Broken stem bolt posted by: Al on 7/31/2000 at 9:29:04 PM
I just twisted off the stem bolt on an old bike. Any suggestions on removal before I drag out the really big hammer? I tried some Liquid Wrench and light tapping. How hard do I dare beat on the wedge?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Broken stem bolt posted by MNSmith on 8/1/2000 at 1:43:01 AM
Is the neck still in the forks?

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Broken stem bolt posted by Al on 8/1/2000 at 9:57:43 PM
Yes, the only thing to come out was the bolt.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Broken stem bolt posted by MNSmith on 8/1/2000 at 10:38:07 PM
Soak it with penetrating oil. If there is a fender screw hole on the bottom side, fill that up too and let it soak. Spray a bunch in the bolt hole up top. It helps to have a soft faced hammer. Even better to have a dead blow hammer. If you don't, use a block of wood between the hammer and the object you are stricking. If you can, turn the bike over and secure it some how. Take a few whacks at the bottom of the neck. Put a pipe or a prying item in the hole where the handle bars used to be and try twisting the neck free. Hopefully, after you get the neck out, the wedge will fall out. If not, find a long pointy item that you can put in the fender hole underneath to tap it out with. Let us know how you make out!

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Broken stem bolt posted by sam on 8/3/2000 at 2:14:17 AM
while the parts are soaking why don't you go to the hardware store and get a long bolt the same diameter but longer put it where the old one broke and hit it (hard).may be hard to do unless the old bolt broke at the wedge.still worth a try

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Broken stem bolt posted by Al on 8/3/2000 at 4:44:02 AM
Thanks for the help, I'll try these this weekend.

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