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Restoration Tips

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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   tires 28" posted by: Jon-Paul Bingham on 5/12/2000 at 11:07:31 AM
Hello all,
my projects are near complete - but tires! can any one help me out
looking for tubeless tires to fit teens 28" wheels (boht steel clad and wooden types)
Would prefer white rubber - but can not be too fussy!

Any help would be appreciated

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   tires 28 posted by sam on 5/16/2000 at 7:31:06 AM
Jon-Paul,those tires can be ordered new but they cost $175 each!A frend had to order two for a Pope bike he restored for a movie.I would try e-bay.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   tires 28 posted by jon on 6/14/2000 at 6:25:09 PM
harper machine in dunbar west virginia sells 28 inch single tube tires at a very reasonable cost about half of what coker wants !!!# 304 768 1147 does anyone know of 26 inch singletube tires for sale?




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Old Dutch bike posted by: Francois Luks on 5/9/2000 at 10:13:31 AM
Looking for a part for an old Dutch bkie (turn of last century?), don't know the brand.
Since I'm not an expert in bike mechanics (certainly not in English), I may be wrong in the name of the part, but I'm looking for a 60 mm 'pedal axle' (literal translation from the Dutch 'trap-as'; anyway, it's the axle that sits in the hub and connects the cranks (and fits in the beearings).
Any tips welcome...

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Old Dutch bike posted by JimW. on 5/26/2000 at 2:32:30 PM
Since no one's responded to this question yet, I'll stick my
oar in. Rather than looking all over for a replacement part,
you might consider having a machine shop make a new one. This
type of part does not require a lot of time to make, therefore,
it would be fairly cheap. It would help a lot if you still have
the old shaft, otherwise you have to supply a dimensioned drawing.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   paint & restoration of my 1951 Western Flyer posted by: Brad on 5/2/2000 at 6:54:15 PM
Hello to everyone again...
Thanks to everyone who responded to my last posting.  I have since learned
alot about the different types of paint...ranging from PPG enamel to
Basecoat/Clearcoat.  I have been in contact with a couple guys who are
willing to help me finish and restore my Western Flyer.  Dave and Jason have
been helpful and shared their knowledge and opinions with me.  Are there any
other enthusiasts out there who would share their opinions of paint types?
Which is better and more durable...and is there a huge benefit to "baked on"
paint?  Is it MUCH more durable or marginally better?  I have alot of
confidence in the 2 guys who have been communicating with me about the paint
issue...but i was just wondering about other opinions on the subject.  I
realize that each probably have their own distinct advantages...but which
has more?  My bike is 2 tone metallic green with red pinstripe detailing.
Also, I have another bike which is essentially the same bike as my "Super",
but was distributed at Montgomery Wards instead of Western Auto.  It is
pretty much identical to my Super but is Black and red...and has white
pinstriping on it.  And fenders are ribbed at the bottom and chromed.
Anyone have a reference pic of this bike?  I might restore this as well but
have not been able to locate original ads for this bike, like I have for my
Western Flyer.  Thanks for any and all input!!

Brad (bdt91@excite.com)

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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Lacing/Building posted by: Patrick on 4/28/2000 at 4:39:20 AM
I want to build custom wheelsets for various bike projects by choosing the hubs and wheels from the vast selection in my garage or whatever I find at sales etc. Can someone provide me with or tell me where to buy a cheap and simple software that gives me the mathematical formula for choosing the correct spoke lengths? My local shop is not very cooperative, saying they pay $150.oo a month for updated info on all current hubs and wheels and the info is not free. This does not apply to what I do because I often have no name, outdated, and antique wheels and hubs which won't show on their charts anyway. I need one that is a formula determined by hub width, hub drill diameter, wheel diameter, spoke count etc. Please help so I can finish a few customs I am trying to complete this summer. Thank You.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Lacing/Building posted by Jeff on 5/1/2000 at 5:43:44 AM
Here are some Spoke Lenght Calculators:

1) a free one written in basic:

http://www.roble.net/marquis/spokelen11.bas

2) a free one written in Microsoft Excel:

http://www.seattleu.edu/student/clubs/Cycling/spoke.htm

3) a free web-based one you can run from your web browser:

http://www.dimensional.com/'manthey/spoke.htm

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Lacing/Building posted by Fred on 5/1/2000 at 11:08:07 AM
Patrick: All you will ever need to know about wheelbuilding can be found in Sheldon Brown's page on the subject. Go to;
"http;//www.sheldonbrown.com/wheelbuild.html" and scroll down to the topics table and click on the spoke calculation cell. I started there a few years ago and have built a dozen or so wheels. There are several spoke calculation programs to pick from. Good luck

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Lacing/Building posted by Mike Q. on 5/13/2000 at 8:12:33 AM
Also, you need to get a new bike shop! If they're paying $150/month for this info, introduce me. I have bridges for sale!




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   need 2x18 tires posted by: Jay on 4/21/2000 at 8:33:19 PM
We need 2x18 inch tires and tubes and nobody has them. It is a 1965, 65cc harley. It is in good condition. If you have any or know where to get them contact me. It would be very helpful.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   need 2x18 tires posted by ChristopherRobin@starmail.com on 5/25/2000 at 8:50:19 AM
Try Coker tire. They are on the web too.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   HeLp posted by: Timothy on 4/20/2000 at 5:16:11 PM
Me and my dad recently bought a 1954 firestone bike from a guy it has all the original parts and everything but he painted it green with house paint!!! underneath the green is a lighter green with pin stripes what is the best way to get to or through the house paint?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   HeLp posted by Bikevato on 4/25/2000 at 4:02:10 PM
Your best bet is by taking the bike apart and having it media blast. If you don't want to restore the bike, what you can do. Get a scrapper and slow scrap the house paint off.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   HeLp posted by Pee-Wee on 4/29/2000 at 7:19:56 AM
Ouch! I've done that before. if you are inexperienced, you might scrape off the original piant! So, try something by Savogran called Kwikeeze-it's great at removing house paint, that is if it has'nt been sitting too long. Good luck, and take your time to get it right.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Monark posted by: Pee-Wee on 4/15/2000 at 5:03:40 PM
I am the proud owner of 7 Monark bicycles, and I was wondering if somebody could please tell me why they went out of business, and when? I think they are excellent bikes and terrific riders. Any help appreciated.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Monark posted by Bikevato on 4/25/2000 at 4:01:09 PM
Your best bet is by taking the bike apart and having it media blast. If you don't want to restore the bike, what you can do. Get a scrapper and slow scrap the house paint off.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Refitting freewheel posted by: Paul on 4/4/2000 at 3:59:50 AM
I have to refit a five speed Suntour freewheel onto an alloy large flange Campag hub. It's the screw on-type. What type of grease or other lubricant should I apply to the threads before screwing it on. These things can be difficult to remove a few years down the track and I want to make future removal as easy as possible.
Any advice/experiences appreciated.
Thanks,
Paul.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Refitting freewheel posted by Morgan on 4/9/2000 at 12:28:46 PM
Clean the threads of both hub & freewheel thoroughly, then spread a LIGHT coat of Phil Wood Tenacious Oil on the hub threads.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Refitting freewheel posted by Teun on 4/18/2000 at 2:38:52 AM
about your qestion which grease to use: try to avoid any 'modern' Campagnolo grease: this just eats into the aluminum. you have a large flange-hub. this indicates an old model. the freewheels on these hubs were usually fitted 'dry'(no grease whatsoever). if you want to grease in order to protect the thread or likewise, try using some penetrating lubricant. the redundant amount will disolve after a short while due to the thread type the freewheel will stay on anyway. there is also a certain type of 'locktite' that can be loosened again after some time if you want to secure it all. this however seems a bit redundant.

wishing you lots of succes,
Teun

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Refitting freewheel posted by Fred on 5/1/2000 at 11:15:17 AM
Grease is OK but I use "Never Sieze" which is Molybdenum Disulfide and some kind of oil or grease. It is water and heat proof. The oil will eventually dry up leaving a dry coat of Molybdenum Disulfide which is used in all kinds of severe applications.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   old schwinn posted by: Jim on 4/2/2000 at 4:05:53 PM
I have an old Schwinn that has a Train Plains Automoboile name plate and has a crank with hearts cutouts in it with a double link chain.Any idea what year it might be?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   old schwinn posted by Dale on 4/4/2000 at 8:05:18 AM
If you look in this website under schwinn serial numbers you will probably find it,if it's a 47' or later.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   How Old Am I posted by: JJ on 3/30/2000 at 4:59:36 AM
I am a men's Schwinn Collegiate 3 (S/N: HP 525367). How old am I?
A number on the kickstand: \\\317\\\

It's black with silver lettering and decals. All original parts.

Thank you

JJ

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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   black spokes/accessories posted by: andrew on 3/29/2000 at 8:41:40 PM
I'm looking for black spokes. I'm trying to restore my late 60's, to early 70's Western Flyer vintage cruiser. I am looking for black or colored spokes. Or even new rims. Just something new, and different. I'd take hints on where to find new stickers or any other accessories also.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   black spokes/accessories posted by Teun. on 4/18/2000 at 2:42:54 AM
try DT (Swiss, i think they are represented by Ritchey). they manufacture blackened spokes that look as if painted. with the advantage that the paint cannot come off. these are made in several sizes and shapes, so you should be able to find the desired items. another maker who does the same: Sapim (Belgium).




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RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Yamaha Moto Bike posted by: Bill on 3/28/2000 at 2:07:09 PM
I am getting a Yamaha Moto Bike and it has rust on the various chromed parts(bars,fender,etc.). Any suggestions on cleaning it up? Is Quick Glo too harsh?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Yamaha Moto Bike posted by Jeff on 3/29/2000 at 6:06:50 AM
Read the pages and pages of tips here.
Start with bronze wool, though.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   old px-10 posted by: chimp on 3/19/2000 at 10:41:49 PM
Hi,
I came into an old peugot road frame a while ago and built it up for my fixed gear commuter bike and was really impressed with the ride it gave me. Since then I have discovered that my frame is a px-10 circa 1970. I was kind of suprised to find out that this dumpster salvage was such a classic and also suprised by the responsive ride that a bike this old provided.
So, my question:
I feel that this frame has alot of life left in it and I intend to use it as an everyday bike. However I realize that it is a classic and want to preserve it until I deceide to restore it. I have alot of the original parts and it seems like a good candidate for a future restoration. The paint is quite chipped and worn in places, as are the decals. What can I do to preserve the frame while still using it as a commuter ? I like the ride so much I might invest in some frame work (rethread BB to italian, change fork, add cable stops etc.) - will this prohibit a restoration at a later date ? One further note. I commute daily in some of the worst winter conditions that the U.S. can muster.
Thanks in advance for your input!

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          forgot to ask posted by chimp on 3/19/2000 at 11:05:48 PM
If any anyone knows a good place to look for a px-10 decals.
Thanks!

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   old px-10 posted by Morgan on 3/22/2000 at 9:16:10 AM
I'd recommend against having the bottom bracket rethreaded to Italian, even if it's doable. Why don't you get a Phil Wood bottom bracket, which is available with French threaded retaining rings, and will survive bad operating conditions better than anything?

From looking around, I'd guess that Peugeot decals, if they're available, are going to cost a bundle, as will restoration. But the PX-10 is everybody's favorite, so you'll always be able to sell it. If you restore it, you're unlikely [as in never] to recover your investment.

Morgan




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Sturmey-Archer posted by: Real on 3/19/2000 at 11:21:07 AM
Wondering if anyone knows the proper oil to be used in the
Sturmey-Archer AW Hubs.Any info would be apreciated as I am
rebuilding one.Thans

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Sturmey-Archer posted by BillG on 3/20/2000 at 6:13:49 AM
Sturmey-Archer makes a special oil for those hubs. I don't know if it's heavier or lighter than motor oil.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Sturmey-Archer posted by ChristopherRobin@starmail.com on 5/25/2000 at 8:49:15 AM
Singer sewing machine oil! You can find it at the local fabric store. Not too much and it will not gum up. The label says "Bicycle gears" and that pal, is you!




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   makin' it shiney! posted by: amy on 3/16/2000 at 1:07:18 PM
hi there!
i just recently bought a beat up old 1974 schwinn breeze. she's beautiful! i'm not looking to restore it or anything, i just want to clean it up and give it a bell and a basket and ride it around town.
there's a lot of rust on it, and i've read older messages on how to take care of that but i was wondering how i may polish up the frame and everywhere else where there is paint. the bike's yellow, and i don't plan on giving it a new paint job or anything, i just want it to shine again. how do i polish it without removing the paint?
are there any other cleaning tips to be had? this bike is really rusty and pretty grimmy, but i'm willing to put some elbow grease into it. i would appreciate any and all suggestions! THANKS!

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   makin' it shiney! posted by Jeff on 3/17/2000 at 6:37:50 AM
Use #7 automotive polishing compound, or if it is really pitted, use light emory paper. Sounds scary, but I've brought back original paint on pitted bikes like this before.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   makin' it shiney! posted by amy on 3/17/2000 at 6:46:48 PM
thanks for the tip! last nite i went out and bought quick-glo but there are some parts where the rust is pretty thick. and it would take forever to use to quick-glo and stuff. are there any other suggestions besides using a bronze steel, which i haven't tried yet... (i'm wondering, won't it scratch the chrome?)

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