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Restoration Tips

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Old Huffy posted by: Vanessa on 4/12/2008 at 8:18:25 PM
Hello,
I just bought an old huffy cruiser today. It looks like it could be from the 70's or so. The original huffy decal is still on it with a flamingo. Can anyone give me an idea of when this bike was made? Or tell me how to find out more information of this bike? Thanks!

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   1966 schwinn continental posted by: Shawn on 3/29/2008 at 10:25:45 AM
Good day, I have what I believe is a 1966 continental #FB75253 I have owned the bike since around 1970. Is it worth restoration? Most parts are original, with the exception of front wheel and seat. Also if anyone could tell me how to find decals for this make & year it will need paint and rechromed. This is a project I've been planning for years finally getting to it after storing for over 30 years, any assistance with suggestions would be appreciated. I am located in Minnesota . Thanks to all.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   1966 schwinn continental posted by Kevin on 4/6/2008 at 5:06:23 PM
Go to www.schwinn.com, then to heritage, then to classic classifieds. Collectors there know where to find anything Schwinn related.




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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   hubs posted by: george on 3/28/2008 at 6:49:20 PM
Hi; i have campy n.r.hubs with a suntour freewheel,can someone tell me what thread type it is. thanks

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS: hubs posted by eric on 6/9/2008 at 1:14:50 PM
Have you been assisted yet?
There are lots of Campy-related websites; locally, these guys are the best http://vecchios.com/
Your hub is likely to be a standardized thread, but anything from a 5 to 7 speed, as threaded freewheels disappeared thereafter. Any regular threaded freewheel will work, most likely.
More signif. is what width (125?, 130mm), as that limits/relates to what you can replace the freewheel with, and also what vintage frames you can use it in safely (gen. steel frames can be tweaked out to fit newer wider rear hubs, but any other material, esp. carbon and alu. can NOT be bent at all w/o risk of frame failure).

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS: hubs posted by eric on 6/9/2008 at 1:17:41 PM
Have you been assisted yet?
There are lots of Campy-related websites; locally, these guys are the best http://vecchios.com/
Your hub is likely to be a standardized thread, but anything from a 5 to 7 speed, as threaded freewheels disappeared thereafter. Any regular threaded freewheel will work, most likely.
More signif. is what width (125?, 130mm), as that limits/relates to what you can replace the freewheel with, and also what vintage frames you can use it in safely (gen. steel frames can be tweaked out to fit newer wider rear hubs, but any other material, esp. carbon and alu. can NOT be bent at all w/o risk of frame failure).




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   i have a schwinn im trying to fix up... posted by: Alexa on 3/19/2008 at 11:29:53 AM
ok so im fixing up a schwinn i bought at a vintage shop in utah many years ago. it was supposed to be a project for my father and i but now its just me and i have NO idea what im doing. i dont want to ruin this thing... any tips or pointers or anything? ill take whatever you can offer. id kind of like to strip the paint and start fresh... tell me if this is some kind of horrible sin.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   i have a schwinn im trying to fix up... posted by Kevin on 3/24/2008 at 6:24:10 PM
It's your bike, and you can do whatever you want. But an amateur paint job will, most likely, lessen the value. Original paint is valuable, even if it's not in great shape. They're only original once. Better to clean and wax the old paint.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   1950's Schwinn Panther paint color question posted by: madison on 3/17/2008 at 12:11:09 PM
I am attempting to restore a 1950's two-tone green schwinn Panther, but I'm not sure of the name of the paint color or type of paint to buy. If anyone could tell me the type of paint and the paint color's name I would appreciate it.

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Swapping Shimano for Suntour HELP - LONG posted by: Jim on 3/11/2008 at 8:57:27 PM
Sorry - this is going to take some time..bear with me...
I had a late 80's Specialized hard rock (sweet ride) equipped with Suntour X-press shifters and XCM derailleurs. I used it for fast, in-town long distance commuting. I also used it to tear up terrain both urban and off-road. It got worked hard! At some point, I decided I needed a smaller frame to jump with, as my long commutes were no longer there. I happened across a guy with same year, same bike smaller frame Shimano gruppo. He needed to commute, as jumping days were over for him. We traded straight across right there, right then.

Took me a couple of days to learn to yearn for my suntours back. I have ever since. Me and the "new" bike learned to live together, and we both survived a gnarly crash which put me in a halo for 9 weeks. Top 2 vertebrae fractured. No problem, once healed - back on the road/dirt.

Now, it's sat in storage for over 2 years. Needs an overhaul. I've hauled it up to Vegas with me - I live in Phoenix. I am on extended duration work stay here. My tool boxes are in Phoenix.

Wasn't sure it was worth overhauling at today's bike shop prices. So, thought I'd check out what was new. Aluminum. That's what's new. BIG UGLY FRAMES and Suntour (the real suntour) is gone...so what now? 700C tires and scrap dirt? Ummm... no... New Cannondale with the ability to change 700C street rims to 26" dirt for $1200 plus $250+ for dirt wheels? Ummm....not yet. I need my CroMo frame, and my decent gruppo back in top condition.

As luck would have it, I pulled into the grocery store to buy a few things and there was a big ass Nishiki Mtn Bike sitting against the "donate your stuff here" bin in the parking lot. Disasembled, missing some parts, etc. What gruppo was on it? Yes. Suntour X-press/XCM.

Now, I threw that in the truck - and put some tires/tubes on it and rode it around the block. That bikes too big for me to be comfy. But it will be ok for awhile (like a week)?

So, now the specialized is sitting torn apart in the garage, bastardized so I can try the old skool gruppo. Definitely needs adjustment.

What I am hoping for in this post - is that someone in Vegas can help me switch out the gruppo to the Specialized as I don't have the tools or experience to do so. Maybe I will just have to pay the shop to do it... I don't know. Either way, I'm still presented with the problem of the Specialized frame bein a tad small for my current commuting around town needs...ahhh...the fun never ends.


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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Rollfast posted by: Emily on 3/8/2008 at 9:32:50 PM
I recently purchased a Rollfast Starlight (gorgeous blue) and am looking to restore the seat, handle bars, and shifting system. I would like to find the original ad or magazine for this amazing bicycle. I think it needs new tires but was wondering if it should have white walled ones. I am looking for a basket for the front as well. I am new to this whole restoration process, so any tips would be great. Thanks!!

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Cleaning up old paint jobs posted by: Kate on 3/8/2008 at 6:55:44 AM
I just discovered that those MR. Clean multi-purpose cleaning pads do an amazing job cleaning up scuffs and some scratches. I just got a 1980's miyata that I thought would need new paint, but after a quick cleaning with one of these (only like ten minutes) it looks almost brand new!

Be careful around decals though- and test a small spot first, my bike is white, but I'm not sure if it would scratch darker colored paints

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   fender lacing posted by: Rosalie Behrens on 3/1/2008 at 8:42:11 AM
I have old iver johnson bicycle with lace rear fender. Does anyone know how to duplicate the lacing pattern?

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Where the heck is the VIN? posted by: Lia on 2/24/2008 at 3:43:54 PM
Hello,
I've found a pretty sad-looking old Schwinn Town and Country Tricycle at a yard sale and (with much thanks to the local bike repair people, my neighbors, my uncle who restores old cars and the patient people at the hardware store) I'm in the process of making it presentable (and usable) again. The person I bought it from thought that it was from the 60s. It has a kickstand bracket welded to the frame and a coaster brake, as well as a (now unreadable) sticker that said it was from Mesa, AZ. I cannot find the VIN number on this thing and I'd love to know what year it is, does anyone know where to look? It's completely in pieces and I feel like I've looked everywhere...
Thanks so much.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Where the heck is the VIN? posted by lia on 2/25/2008 at 1:35:48 PM
Oh, and the decal on the front of the frame says Schwinn, Chicago, and 0426 on it.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Where the heck is the VIN? posted by Lia on 2/26/2008 at 12:28:27 PM
OK, needed some sandpaper- found it on the part where the handlebars go in. Now I don't understand it...
JL528174
Help?

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Where the heck is the VIN? posted by TheWiz on 2/27/2008 at 7:33:53 AM
You bike was built in October of 1976

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC: Where the heck is the VIN? posted by Emily on 4/22/2008 at 10:57:11 AM
With all due respect to TheWiz, your bike was actually built in September of 1975 because the letter I isn't counted when computing the year from the serial number. Here's a better explanation http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfromthepast/schwinumber.txt




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Looking for 1/4" rubber tank trim posted by: Marc on 2/17/2008 at 5:07:58 PM
Hi all:
I'm restoring a 1960's Rollfast Spacemaster Spaceweight bike. I'm trying to find a U-shaped rubber trim that is flexible and about 1/4-inch wide on both legs, so I can lay it around the edges and curves of the sharp edges of my tank so that the tank does not damage my frame. It's rubber trim, but I don't know where to find it or what it's called. Any tips will be enormously appreciated. Thanks. Marc W.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Looking for 1/4 posted by doug on 3/2/2008 at 5:56:02 AM
Find a auto restoration shop in your area they can usually point you in the right direction to find this type of thing or might have what your looking for on the shelf.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Looking for 1/4 posted by Shawsheen on 3/9/2008 at 4:16:40 AM
Go to auto parts store...get the little rubber, plactic type strips that go on door edges. You konw the ones that protect the edge of your car doors when you open them...Should fit on edge of tank (?) and they come in several colors.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Looking for 1/4 posted by J on 3/10/2008 at 12:52:19 PM
you are looking for "windlacing". the other guys are right, check an autoparts store. good luck, j




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Coca Cola Cleaning Solution? posted by: David Markovitz on 2/10/2008 at 12:43:36 PM
I've heard that I could use Coca Cola as a cleaning solution for old bike parts. Is this safe? Is there something other than aluminum foil that I can use? How do I apply? What precautions do I need to take? What is best way to remove residue? Is residue harmful? In short, I need to know everything about this method.
Dave

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Coca Cola Cleaning Solution? posted by inaheap on 2/10/2008 at 3:41:36 PM
I have used coca cola to loosen rusted bolts. Although it did help a little I recommend something like kroil or BP Blaster.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT: Coca Cola Cleaning Solution? posted by Theo on 2/24/2008 at 12:02:41 PM
It really all depends on what you are trying to clean.

My understanding is that the pH of coca cola is useful in removing rust. It was an old standby in the days of car restoration and true chrome bumpers. It is unlikely to hurt anything.

Another suggestion is to use oxalic acid - a very mild oxidizer that is said to be kind to surrounding metal.

The aluminum foil method is very benign. So are simichrome paste and many commercial chrome polishers (Turtle Wax, for example). Have you tried the Menotomy materials? They are well tried and work well.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT: Coca Cola Cleaning Solution? posted by jj on 3/17/2008 at 4:31:22 AM
Never had any luck using Coca Cola on rust

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Coca Cola Cleaning Solution? posted by Martin Sanders on 4/25/2008 at 2:32:39 AM
Try using ordinary malt vinegar, I've used it for years with good results, make sure the part is degreased first as the vinegar will not act through oil and grease. I put the parts in vinegar as I am stripping the bicycle and leave them there for anything up to a week or so while I get on with the rest.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Motobecane serial number posted by: Jerry on 2/5/2008 at 1:01:39 PM
I would like to date my Le Champion. Can someone help me with how to read the serial number. It's easy to read, I just don't know the code. Any help? Thank you.

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Motobecane Grand Touring bike posted by: Jason on 1/14/2008 at 12:45:00 PM
I am restoring an old Motobecane Grand Touring bike and the pedal wrench I have doesn't fit, any one have an idea what size wrench would work?

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   schwinn pedals posted by: Sheldon Strohecker on 12/18/2007 at 5:44:54 PM
I' m not sure how to remove the pedals off of an old schwinn breeze. I can get them to tighten and to back out a half turn but then they stop using reasonable force. They look as if they should screw right out with a 9/16" wrench but it don't seem to want to come out. They aren't rusty. I'm afraid to strip the threads in the crank. Thanks for your help!

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