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Restoration Tips

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Sting Ray Restoration posted by: George Kopcial on 12/1/2007 at 5:43:28 PM
Hello, Everyone. I still own the bicycle I received as a Christmas present in 1967... a Schwinn DeLuxe three-speed sting ray. It had the stick shift, hand brakes, white-walled tires, and was blue in color. It is in pieces now, however it is all there, and was in working condition when disassembled thirty years ago or so. I would like to completely restore the bike from top to bottom, and bring it back to its original, showroom condition. Does anyone out there know who does re-chroming of bicycle wheels, handle bars, seat stays, etc. Also, where is the best place to look for Sturmey-Archer three-speed rear hubs, in case mine needs re-built? Any sources for brake cables, and banana seats? Thank you very much.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Sting Ray Restoration posted by ken on 12/16/2007 at 5:00:43 PM
ebay is a good place to find those parts

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Sting Ray Restoration posted by TheWiz on 2/27/2008 at 7:36:30 AM
You can contact Pete Aroson at Hyper-Formance stingrays for your paint, decals, seat & other things. www.hyper-formance.com

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Sting Ray Restoration posted by KEvin on 3/24/2008 at 6:27:47 PM
Go to www.schwinn.com, then click on "Heritage." IT is loaded with people buying, selling and trading original Sting-Ray parts and whole bikes. It's often cheaper to buy a new part than to get one rechromed.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   What's New posted by: Menotomy Vintage Bicycles at OldRoads.com on 12/1/2007 at 6:35:55 AM
Be sure to check out what's new at OldRoads by clicking on the "What's New" icon near the top right hand corner of this page.

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Chrome Spray Paint posted by: Shalon on 11/19/2007 at 1:25:31 PM
What are your thoughts on using chrome spray paint for fenders and handlebars and such?
Personally I fear it will look fake and cheap. Anyone ever done it and gotten a good result?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Chrome Spray Paint posted by Skip on 11/20/2007 at 5:12:22 AM
I've never seen any type of spray paint work on chromed parts. It always looks bad and I would not recommend it.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT: Chrome Spray Paint posted by shalon on 11/20/2007 at 7:11:55 AM
That's kinda what I figured. Dang. So does anyone have any suggestions on the best way to clean and polish chrome?

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT: Chrome Spray Paint posted by David Poston on 11/22/2007 at 2:34:36 PM
Use copper wool with the Menotomy mixture sold on this site (or use oil). Don't use steel wool. It will cause rust. When you've copper-wooled as much as you can, use a rag and some Simichrome. This is the best and safest method I've come up with after much trial and error.

If the chrome is badly rusted, use various grades of sandpaper to get it smoothed down and then use the simichrome.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Chrome Spray Paint posted by inaheap on 12/19/2007 at 12:39:16 PM
I have used chrome spray paint. the only kind I have ever found that doesn't look like grey paint when dry is rustoleum. (make sure it is chrome) I would never use it on fenders, handlebars, or anything else that large unless there was absolutely no chrome left at all. It seems al right for the ends of pedals, nuts and bolts, and other small parts as long as the major chrome parts of the bike are in decent shape. It is similar enough that their shine tends to hide its lack there of. But it is a blatent fake on the larger parts like handlebars, sissy bars, fenders, etc. If you would like an idea what it would look like check out my JC Higgins in the Balloon forum. Those metal components were bare metal not a crumb of chrome left. I want to rechrome at some point so I painted them to help preserve them in the mean time.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Chrome Spray Paint posted by inaheap on 12/19/2007 at 12:41:42 PM
If you do use spray paint, you may want to put some in the lid or soemthing and use a small paint brush to apply. This seems to work best on the smallest components.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Chrome Spray Paint posted by Roger Walling on 12/25/2007 at 8:23:24 AM
There is chrome paint now on the market that is advertised as 99% chrome like. I have seen pictures of it and it is really good. The only trouble is that you must apply a absolutely perfect black hand rubbed finish to the part and then use the product. It is expensive. Auto Craft Inc in Springfield Ma. (413 739 5624) has information on it. They have not sold any though, as it is very expensive. If the counter man doesn’t know what you are asking for, ask to speak to Ron.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Chrome Spray Paint posted by Toby on 3/6/2008 at 8:56:36 PM
Chrome or silver spray paint is going to like what it is;
metallic paint. There is no substitute for electroplating.
The closest I have found after being a sign painter for over
35 years is chrome mylar. This is available through any sign
supplies outfit. The only drawback is it doesn't conform to
anything but flat or straight round tubular surfaces.
It doesn't bend or stretch much, even with heat,(a hair dryer).
The next best thing if you want it to conform to curves, is
silver or aluminum leaf. Aluminum is cheaper and won't tend
to tarnish even after being clearcoated with a quality clearcoat,
i.e. automotive enamel. Leaf is also available with gold size
(the stuff that makes the leaf stick to your surface.)
Best to get a book about gold & silver leafing at your local
library or crafts, or sign supply store.
GOOD LUCK! ......Toby




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RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Where to buy good tires? posted by: John Neil on 11/18/2007 at 9:05:38 AM
I have a '55 Indian Scout that is in great condition. I've located appropriate grips, saddle, and pedals for it, but since I plan to use it as a townie, it will need new tires before too many miles. The current ones are good, but significantly cracked around the bead.

What options are there for finding EA3 tires? I see that harris carries a few models, and I'd like to find something other than the kenda type tires that seem to be the only ones availble. If it had a slick tread, was fairly correct for the bike, and was good enough for evertday use, I'd be a happy camper. Reccomendations on model and where to purchase (internet is great) are highly appreciated.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Where to buy good tires? posted by Jeff R on 11/25/2007 at 9:44:52 AM
The tire that I use is a Specialized Tri-Sport 26 X 1 3/8. It has a FLAK JACKET PROTECTION label on it, and is rated for 80 psi. I have a set on my '52 Indian Scout, my '54 Norman sports and a '56 Triumph sports. They work and ride very well. I ordered them from my local bike shop. The last time I ordered these tires was about 3 years ago. I hope they are still available. Try www.specialized.com

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - WHEELS:   Where to buy good tires? posted by Jeff R on 11/25/2007 at 9:53:13 AM
I just checked the website and they still have them. They are listed under the size 26 X 1.0-1.5.




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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Harry Quinn transfers posted by: Tom Davies on 11/17/2007 at 4:50:36 AM
I have just unearthed my old Quinn bike ,I had it resprayed many years ago by Chas Roberts and didn't ,at the time try and get any transfers. Can anyone help either with transfers or a contact'Thanks in anticipation
Tom davies

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Harry Quinn transfers posted by: Tom Davies on 11/17/2007 at 4:50:36 AM
I have just unearthed my old Quinn bike ,I had it resprayed many years ago by Chas Roberts and didn't ,at the time try and get any transfers. Can anyone help either with transfers or a contact'Thanks in anticipation
Tom davies

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Harry Quinn transfers posted by andrew on 3/23/2008 at 6:43:05 AM
Hi Tom - came across your query - you could try this guy in the UK - he seems to have them. Cheers, Andrew

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/NICK_AT_LLOYDS/decals.htm




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   putting front wheel back on solid fork posted by: Pat on 11/14/2007 at 2:26:08 PM
Is there a trick to putting the front wheel back onto an antique bike with a solid fork? The wheel was removed several years ago and I cannot seem to remember how to get the axle back into the solid fork.

Thanks,
Pat

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   What kind of paint to use? posted by: tanya on 11/12/2007 at 2:19:22 PM
I am clueless with regard to where to get high quality paint for the restoration of my Monark Super Deluxe girls bicycle. I am also looking for a set of stencils to put the pinstriping on. This is going to my motherinlaw for Christmas so any help asap will greatly appreciated!!

Thank you,
Tanya

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   New Coat-o-Paint posted by: John on 11/6/2007 at 6:15:03 PM
I've learned from the discussion board that repainting an original scheme is definetly taboo. Work with what you have, it's only original once...I get it. My newest project, a '37 roadmaster deluxe, does not have an original paintjob. It looks as if the previous would-be-reviver of this work of art kept very much in the style of the original scheme (beautiful hand painted accents/ pinstripes) except for one very crucial factor: his color matching ability was greatly lacking. What should be a luscious verdant green accented by mellow cream is a foppish seafoam on teal (gag). It looks like he visited a hobby shop for the paint...or even home depot. Truth be told I'm just as clueless with regard to where to get high quality paint meant for this kind of restoration. Any ideas? I imagine it will be harder than color matching through NAPA auto parts. Thankfully though, the ugly paint from the previous restoration(s) was incredibly easy to remove and the elegant steel frame is now a brilliant near-mirror finish. Where do I go from here?

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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   what is it posted by: Dion on 11/5/2007 at 7:02:10 AM
Ihave a JC higgins.and can't find it anywhere,it has white wall tires,blueish green in color with a built in headlight.can you tell me anything about it?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   what is it posted by Skip on 11/6/2007 at 4:52:13 AM
Search the archives here on OldRoads (use the black Google box above).
You'll find volumes of information, pictures and pricing on JC Higgins cycles.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   what is it posted by DION on 11/6/2007 at 5:51:48 AM
TY SKIP,but i'm still haveing trouble finding this bike.I know it's a girls bike.I can't find any markings besides JC HIGGINS.I did find #'s on the tires SEARS ALLSTATE safety tred 26x1.7 #50205.I'm pretty computer illiterate'so i don't have much of an idea what i'm doing.Any help would be very appreciated.Thank you for your reply.DION

          RE:RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   what is it posted by DION on 11/6/2007 at 6:26:46 AM
I think i may have a match with the 1964-69 spaceliner,but i'm not sure.any suggestion's on how to verify.




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Reader's Rides! posted by: Vin - Menotomy Vintage Bicycles on 10/18/2007 at 7:26:55 AM

We've brought back the Reader's Rides section of OldRoads.com.

If you offer a service or have bikes, parts, ads, literature,
accessories, books, auction items or anything else related to
Vintage Bicycles for sale, or if you just want to show off your
cycles, click on "Readers Rides" at the top right of any page
of our site and build your own web site.

It is free and you get 5 megabytes of web space and your own unique
address.

Vin - Menotomy Vintage Bicycles
http://OldRoads.com

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Reader's Rides! posted by Vin on 10/20/2007 at 5:40:43 AM

Based on your feedback, we have set it up so you can have 25 pictures and almost unlimited text.

Vin - Menotomy Vintage Bicycles
OldRoads.com




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Installing handgrips posted by: Rolf Hargis on 10/12/2007 at 9:58:48 AM
I have a 68 Raleigh 3-speed roadster. Just installed a new trigger shifter, cable and spindle. Managed this OK, but I am now stuck on putting on new handgrips. They are too sticky to slide on all the way, and I don't want to use any type of lube, because, of course, I want them to stay in place and not slide once installed.

Any tips on pushing on new handgrips, while ensuring that once they are on they don't move?

Thanks,
Rolf.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Installing handgrips posted by Jeff R on 10/13/2007 at 5:53:17 PM
Use rubbing alcohol.

          RE:RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Installing handgrips posted by wayne on 10/16/2007 at 1:07:55 AM
"To install grips, put a little plain water on the grip and handlebar, and slip the grip on all in one smooth movement. Do not ride the bicycle until the water has dried and the grip is tight. If the grip is stubborn, you can blow compressed air at the edge of the grip, and the air will flow between the grip and the handlebar, acting as a lubricant. If compressed air is not available, you can bang on the end of the grip with a soft hammer. Synonym: Grips."

- http://www.bikewebsite.com/bikeoh.htm

I concur also with alcohol as stated and possibly a little soap is used sometimes too. Just listing options.


As for the quote about using a soft hammer, if I did such, I might cover the grip with a towel or other cloth and gently go at it.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Installing handgrips posted by j on 3/10/2008 at 1:12:46 PM
hi, i have always used hairspray, yes, hairspray. there is a use for that Aqua Net stuff afterall. here is how i went about it in the past.

spray the inside of the grip to moisten the inside wals. use a finger to ensure the spray has coated all sides of the rubber grip. push on the handlebars while wet. let dry. when the hairspray dries, it dries tacky which will give your grips just enough grip so that they do not spin while riding. and you will be able to get them off later on too, so its not a super strong bond.

with a wet rag you can clean an excess hairspray.

have fun, j




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RESTORATION TIPS - MISC:   Vintage Columbia Parts? posted by: Charles on 9/29/2007 at 8:41:53 PM
I have a Columbia 3 Star DeLuxe that I am working on, and hoping to get it restored soon. I need some parts, such as the rear rack (carrier), and the fender headlight. I have the original chainguard, but it is in poor condition, so I would love to replace it as well. I am unsure of the year, but have been told it is a late 40's era bicycle. I need to get the serial number from the bike and reference the year to be positive. Any help with a source for the parts would be much appreciated! Reproductions are fine, if available.

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RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Rust posted by: Lori on 9/28/2007 at 3:45:38 PM
I have my 1980's style Radioflyer roadster that I am wanting to restore for my children. The wheels are pretty rusted as well as the rest of the bike. It is also missing the pedals. Any ideas as to how I can get the rust off with out further damaging the tricycle?

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Rust posted by Everett on 10/12/2007 at 7:31:58 AM
There are several ways to remove rust. A wire brush can remove rust but will possibly leave scrathes. When I was a young man, I used a product called "Naval Jelly" to remove light surface rust from my chrome wheels and bumpers on my old hotrods. It worked ok for light rust but left a bit to be desired on heavier rust. There is also a process that can be used that's very efficient and not all that hard to do, but it's more involved than just brushing and rubbing. You will need a plastic tub, a battery charger, and some sacrificial steel. (re-bar will work for that and can be bought in short sections from lowes or home depot.

You can do a google search on "electrolysis + rust removal" or rust removal by electrolysis" and that should bring up some pages revealing detailed instructions and examples. Read as much as you can about it and follow all safety guidelines. Be sure to perform the procedure in a well vented area (like outdoors) and be aware that the bubbles that will rise up from your workpiece will have tiny amounts of hydrogen in them.

Electrolysis can be very effective and you will lose little to none of your original material provided you do it properly. You will need to remove the tires from the wheels. You should only be working with metal parts, and not leave any plastic or rubber parts attached to the metal part that you wish to clean.

The process really isn't that complicated. You just have to be sure that you hook your wires up correctly (if not then your work piece will become the sacrificial metal)

There are quite a few articles online that explain the process in detail. Some have pictures. Google it and read it carefully. Good luck.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Rust posted by Everett on 10/12/2007 at 8:01:37 AM

I forgot to mention that you could always use sandpaper starting with a coarse grit and finishing with a finer grit (to remove scrathes. That process might become pretty tedious, but should work fairly well.

Electrolysis would be much less tedious once you have everything set up properly. You should have a nice shiney part within and hour or so. (depending of course on how much rust and/or paint needs to be removed)What I like best about electrolysis is that your original material isn't removed like it could be when using abrasives. Best Regards

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - PAINT:   Rust posted by Everett on 10/12/2007 at 8:05:35 AM

I forgot to mention that you could always use sandpaper starting with a coarse grit and finishing with a finer grit (to remove scrathes. That process might become pretty tedious, but should work fairly well.

Electrolysis would be much less tedious once you have everything set up properly. You should have a nice shiney part within and hour or so. (depending of course on how much rust and/or paint needs to be removed) What I like best about electrolysis is that your original material isn't removed like it could be when using abrasives. Best Regards




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RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Suburban chain restoration posted by: Chad on 9/25/2007 at 11:56:52 AM
I recently bought a schwinn suburban from a junk dealer. It looks like the bike has seen a bit of weather and the chain needs plenty of loving. I was going to break the chain and give a good cleaning and regreasing but my chain tool is made for contemporary chains and is too small. Any suggestions? Thanks.

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          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST:   Suburban chain restoration posted by skip on 9/26/2007 at 4:37:18 AM
Too small meaning the pin isn't long enough? Or too narrow?
A cheap chain tool from Walmart should work.

          RE:RESTORATION TIPS - RUST: Suburban chain restoration posted by Chad on 9/26/2007 at 8:23:34 AM
The chain does not seat far enough in the chain tool so the pin hits below the rivet. In other words, the space from the edge of the chain to the rivet is farther than on contemporary chains. The chain tool is a park tool and works on all of my newer bikes. I am thinking of just trying to restore the chain while on the bike but it would be must easier to remove it and rejuvenate it.

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