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Vintage Bicycle Discussion Area

Hi-Wheeler, Boneshaker and Safety

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FOR SALE:   USED 48" HI WHEEL REPLICA Boneshaker posted by: Randy Berscheid on 10/12/2003 at 3:12:43 AM
Hi, I have just put a bike some may be interested in on ebay. I hope you will take a look and pass the info on if you know of some one looking.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3631430377

thanks

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          RE:FOR SALE:   USED 48 (SOLD) posted by Randy Berscheid on 10/12/2003 at 4:55:00 PM
thanks for getting the word out. the bike has sold already

          RE:FOR SALE:   USED 48 posted by Bruce Harrison on 11/16/2003 at 1:05:32 AM
Hello Randy,

I really enjoyed looking at the bike pictures on ebay. I saw a feature I could not explain. There is a verticle bar in front of the front fork on each side of the front wheel--apparently for some sort of adjustment. Could you satisfy my curiosity about this? Thanks, Bruce




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MISC:   George Wyman Site Update posted by: Rif Addams on 10/12/2003 at 2:49:02 AM
I have just added a whole bunch of new pictures and text to the new George A. Wyman web site.
It can be seen at:
http://www.angelfire.com/wa3/rif_addams/home.html
Click on the "road updates" link to see the new pic.s and read the beginings of the centennial ride across the country.
Click on the "building the bike" to see some of the build up of our replica. I have only just started on that page so it's still kinda sparse and rough, but some of it is there.
It took a while but i guess I'm starting to figure out this whole web site building, html writing, techno crap.
:-)
Keep the Tire Side Down,
Rif

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MISC:   Cycle history book posted by: Rif Addams on 10/3/2003 at 3:57:23 PM
Hi All,
I just checked out an excellent book from the library titled "On Your Bicycle" by James McGurn
ISBN 0-8160-1748-4
This book starts out with the prehistory of cycles in the 1680's with the hand crank tri wheeled coach that Stephan Farffler, an invalid clockmaker, had built for himself and used to go to church each sunday; complete with a woodcut print of said vehicle and builder.
From this it goes through the Draisiennes and Hobby Horses, then down through the ages to the 1980's.
This book includes source notes, bibliography, etc. It is one of the most complete histories I have yet come across. I would highly recommend this to anyone with an interest in cyling and it's illustrious history.
Rif

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WANTED:   WANTED: 48" RBR BONESHAKER STANDARD posted by: BURT ENGLISH on 10/1/2003 at 7:07:45 PM
MID-ATLANTIC, CAROLINA COAST. I WILL PAY CASH FOR A BONESHAKER STANDARD IN GOOD SHAPE. PLEASE E-MAIL: SK8BURT@HOTMAIL.COM

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WANTED:   WANTED: 48" RBR BONESHAKER STANDARD posted by: BURT ENGLISH on 10/1/2003 at 7:07:45 PM
MID-ATLANTIC, CAROLINA COAST. I WILL PAY CASH FOR A BONESHAKER STANDARD IN GOOD SHAPE. PLEASE E-MAIL: SK8BURT@HOTMAIL.COM

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MISC:   Hi Wheel?ordinary posted by: Pete Keeler on 10/1/2003 at 3:44:57 PM
Could someone please explain to me exactly how the 'spine' tube locates to the forks/head tube on the very old penny farthings(as we call them in the UK.) I'm referring to the type that do not appear to have a head set, but rather a slot in the back of the fork head. I would like to know what shape the end of the spine tube is. Thanks.

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          RE:MISC:   Hi Wheel?ordinary posted by teun on 10/2/2003 at 6:48:16 PM
Trying to contact you via email but my message gets bounced.
Maybe a typo in your email address?

Diagnostic-Code: X-Postfix; host smtp.ntlworld.com[62.253.162.40] said: 550
Invalid recipient: [ntl-ct8-cb487@ntlworld.com] (in reply to RCPT TO
command)

          RE:MISC:   Hi Wheel?ordinary posted by Greg Barron on 10/6/2003 at 5:26:29 PM
How the spine locates in the fork? If I understand the question, you would like to know how the frame goes into the head and stays in place? The heads of most of the original bikes had a slot and socket drilled and milled into the rear to accomodate the neck casting that is at the top end of the spine, the neck casting usually ends in a pivot pin that sits vertically. Normally on the bikes, the spine/neck would slip into the head casting and then be held in place by an adjuster bolt that would push downward on the pivot pin shape forcing it into the head casting which usually has a socket at the inner bottom portion to hold the pin in the same way the adjuster bolt has a recess drilled into it to hold the pin at the top. Ok Pete, I don't know if this helped but you can go look at the pics I have on my website www.hiwheel.com look at the Superior model as it uses original casting copies from a G&J. Hope that helps.

Best Regards,
Greg Barron
RBR Inc.




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WANTED:   The Wheelman HIGHWHEELER-where can I get one? posted by: Erik on 9/28/2003 at 5:07:46 PM
Does anyone know who sells the "The Wheelman" Highwheeler?
I believe they were or still are manufactured in Chatanooga, TN.

Best regards and thanks in advance.

Erik in Los Angeles, CA.

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          RE:WANTED:   The Wheelman HIGHWHEELER-where can I get one? posted by marcello on 9/28/2003 at 10:28:53 PM
hi Eric u might check with coker tire 1-800bigbike.com I heard they are not making that bike anymore but I am not sure , u might check it out for urself, the price was about 400$ of course + S&H they are nice cute bikes. there are other site that u might want to check as well www.hiwheel.com they make boneshakers they are very durable and srong bikes as well. GOOD LUCK




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AGE / VALUE:   Need new rubber tire on my Hi Wheeler posted by: Ron on 8/20/2003 at 5:05:05 PM
I live in New Hampshire I have been trying to find someone locally who can replace the solid rubber tire on my Hi Wheeler Its a newer copy of a 1883 Star. It got real loose and the wire broke . I would also like to purchase the tool for putting the tire on if anyone has one for sale.

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          RE:AGE / VALUE: Need new rubber tire on my Hi Wheeler posted by Mike on 8/22/2003 at 3:48:15 AM
http://www.hiwheel.com/
Rideable Bicycle Replicas - www.hiwheel.com

          RE:AGE / VALUE:   Need new rubber tire on my Hi Wheeler posted by New tire on 9/5/2003 at 6:54:18 PM
I can sell you tire and wire but the problem is you being able to install it. It takes special tools and technique that if you don't have, make it difficult to do the deed. I can point you to someone a little closer to you that may be able to help out. His name is Carl Burgwardt in Orchard Park, New York. His contact addy is bicyclemus@aol.com, he can help you if anyone can in your part of the country.
No one that I am aware of makes the tool for tire installation anymore. I could be wrong though, it's just that I haven't heard of any available in a while. If you have some metal skill and some time I could tell you how to ake a tool and then all you would need to do is figure out the technique. A couple practice trys and you would probably get it. Luck.

Greg Barron
RBR Inc.




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MISC:   Staighten Wooden Wheels posted by: Mike Patterson on 8/18/2003 at 10:21:01 PM
I have recently aquired a couple of wooden wheels for my 'teens bike and one of them has been missing a spoke for a long time and has an abrupt and deep ( in it. The other is de-laminating slightly. I will need to chang the hubs and re-spoke these wheels but I wanted to know if there is a simple or complicated way af straightening these wheels so they run true.
Also, is there any where one can purchase new or recent wooden wheels for track use? Thanks

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          RE:MISC:   Staighten Wooden Wheels posted by Greg Barron on 9/5/2003 at 6:56:22 PM
You may be able to contact Jacques Graber through the Wheelmen, as I understand it, he has wood rims available in a couple sizes.

Greg

          RE:MISC:   Staighten Wooden Wheels posted by bill on 9/25/2003 at 3:04:14 AM
I use a large metal box with about an inch of water in the bottom to steam rims. I place the rim on firebrick in the box and put a simple lid on it. You want the rim above he water, not in it. place it on an OLD electric stove and let it steam for an hour and twent minutes and when it is soft and pliable I clamp it in between two sections of heavy plywood with blocks around it to keep it round, and then let it dry for 3 or so days. be sure that the stove is old because all of the newer stoves have electronics in the top of them and the heat reflected down will fry them in a heartbeat. voice of experience there!!! a propane grill might do it as well. you are looking for the heat and steam to do the softening of the wood. Heavy leather welding gloves help in moving the hot rim! After it dries you will probably have to reglue the joint and the refinish it too but it can be trued as a normal wheel. a lot of work but it can be done. I use titebond 2 glue with good luck since it is water resistant.




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WANTED:   Penny Farthing plans wanted posted by: Michael on 8/14/2003 at 10:42:29 PM
Does anyone know where I can acquire the design specifications for a Penny Farthing style of bicycle? I would like to build one from scratch.

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          RE:WANTED:   Penny Farthing plans wanted posted by teun on 8/19/2003 at 7:11:50 AM
Try the Velorama bicycle museum in Nijmegen. They have the most extensive libary of all.
But to be honest: building a bike from a plan is nearly impossible. Takes most builders years to come up with a ridable design.
Best to use your own highwheeler and experience at riding and then refining it's design to suit your needs.

If you decide to build anyhow and need pointers will be glad to help. You reply via email (link).

          RE:WANTED:   Penny Farthing plans wanted posted by Bill on 9/12/2003 at 5:42:03 AM
Plans are a little hard to find. There are a lot of images of highwheels on the web and these can be helpful. The main problems are getting spokes long enough and what to use for tires. I have recently built a highwheel from scratch--not a work of art, but quite servicable. My rambling project log can be found at:

http://patheon.yale.edu/'whr5/oridinary.html

That being said, unless you are quite handy, have access to metal working and welding equipment, and have a lot of free time, you might consider buying one. If you want a beautiful bike those are availible for $2-3000, if you want a big wheel and a little wheel that you can ride they're in the $800-1200 range. I love tinkering, so even if I'd failed at my project, it would have been a good excuse to play with tools. Be certian you know what you want before you start out. It's amazing what alittle imagination and a lot of elbow grease can produce!

Greg Barron at Ridable Bicycle Replicas (www.hiwheel.com) is a good resource for various level bikes, parts, and general hiwheel community awareness.

Dive in!

Bill

          RE:RE:WANTED:   Penny Farthing plans wanted posted by Bill on 9/22/2003 at 7:47:54 AM
Sorry, mistake in address. Correct one is as follows

http://pantheon.yale.edu/'whr5/ordinary.html

          RE:WANTED:   Penny Farthing plans wanted posted by Russell Calder on 11/28/2004 at 12:43:48 PM
I would like to build my own Penny Farthing here in Australia. Are there 'plans' or 'designs' available on internet that might help me? thanks RC




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MISC:   Columbia Fork Measurements Needed posted by: Mr Bob on 8/9/2003 at 1:39:25 PM
Can someone please help me with the fork measurements (on the drawing) for a Columbia Hi-Wheel bike. I am trying to build one but I am an Expat living in Thailand. There are no Hi-Wheels over here. Thanks, Bob
Here is the Drawing:
http://tallbike.com/measure.html
PS, the Columbia seems like a good bike to model my "TallBike" after. It seems very basic and Classic in looks. I personally like the Straight handlebars. Is there another more popular bike to model my bike after? I need to keep the costs down. There are many out there that want a Classic looking High Wheel for under $500 usd. I am trying to do this so please help if you can, again Thanks, Bob

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          RE:MISC:   Columbia Fork Measurements Needed posted by Teun on 8/12/2003 at 9:54:56 AM
Mr Bob,

Got a columbia Light Roadster (highwheeler) myself so i think i can help you. Please contact me directly for measurements (will need to measure up my bike first).




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AGE / VALUE:   boneshaker high wheeler posted by: Randy Berscheid on 8/8/2003 at 1:27:22 AM
I have owned 2 high wheel bikes for 12 years and use to ride them in parades. Any info on this would be appreciated. The plate on the neck says "Boneshaker" and at the bottom "Cleveland, ohio" Also a sn#--4801802 Please e-mail me.
Thanks in advance for your help.

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          RE:AGE / VALUE:   boneshaker high wheeler posted by marcello on 8/8/2003 at 2:52:48 AM
u need any info . go to www.hiwheel.com Greg is making those bikes, he will help u with any info that u need. good luck




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MISC:   Across America posted by: Rif Addams on 8/6/2003 at 5:18:26 PM
Hi All,
I just wanted to update you on the Wyman Centennial Run of 2003...
I made it home alive, Even with being clipped by a semi truck and sent careening off the road at 35 M.P.H., with the rear wheel losing its 'Tensegrity' and turning into a poytato chip stop sign shape, and with the frame of that 100 year old bike breaking in two and falling out from underneath me.
I made it to the New York state line when the frame gave up the ghost. The bike is now sitting in my shop and I will probably not look at it for another few weeks. Thank you to all of you who gave me advice, and/or support for this historic recreation. It was truly the adventure of a lifetime.
Some of the photos can be seen at our new website:
http://a.1asphost.com/wyman/
I have just finished scanning some more photos and will be adding them shortly. We also have posted some of the newspaper articles about the trip from across the country.
Thanks again for everything.
Keep the Tire Side Down,
Rif Addams

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AGE / VALUE:   racycle posted by: dave brown on 7/31/2003 at 2:04:39 AM
Hi Can anyone date my racycle bicycle . The model # is 165 Thanks for your time

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          RE:AGE / VALUE:   racycle posted by Brain Doanor on 12/3/2003 at 9:10:20 PM
Dave, I think your Racycle dates from 1911. Racycle changed their model numbers annually. The Model 50 through 55 series was produced in 1900, and each year the model numbers increased by 10 for the 6 individual models they offered. Thus, the 100 through 105 series was produced in 1905, and the 150 through 155 series was produced in 1910. My source for this is a series of catalogs that I have from 1900, 1905, 1908, and 1910. The numbering is consistent throughout the period covered by the catalogs, so I don't see why it would be different for 1911, when the 160 through 165 series should have been produced. The last digit signifies the exact model produced. A zero (e.g., 160) would designate the top-of-the-line Racycle Pacemaker with its 40-tooth inch-pitch front sprocket. A one designates the racing model, and numbers two through five designate Racycle roasters with progressively less flashy equipment bolted onto them. In your case (and in mine, as I have a 1908 Model 135), you have the basic Racycle bicycle, which the manufacturer loudy proclaimed was superior to any "bicycle". So I suppose congratulations are in order!

          RE:RE:AGE / VALUE:   racycle posted by Brain Doanor on 2/5/2009 at 11:23:06 PM
In the five-plus years since I posted the info here about Racycle model numbers, I have been slowly accumulating more historical resources on Racycles and have recently started a web blog. Stop by http://racycle.blogspot.com/ and see what's old (and tired). Topics are listed on the right side of the blog page. More info will be posted as time allows.

          RE:AGE / VALUE:   racycle posted by James Mcgregor on 12/1/2009 at 7:23:09 PM
Jamie here in ontario,recently found a Racycle frame and crank , possibly around 1907 seems to have the wrong fork and someone other than myself has the badge and model # that it would require to think about a restoration project not to many parts here in the great white north.HELP THANKS
by: 208.114.152.128




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FOR SALE:   Used 48" Standard Model for sale posted by: Greg Barron on 7/17/2003 at 8:34:39 PM
Hello all, I was rumaging throught the back shop areas and found enough old parts to put together a used 48" Standard Model hiwheel. It has a rebuilt front wheel and new tire as well as a new rear wheel. It will be a sound bike but the frame and fork are quite cosmetically challenged though nothing a can of Krylon wouldn't fix. If you are interested then let me know. I'm going to offer it here first at $450 plus shipping with shipping running up to $190 for the East Coast. If I don't get any bites here in a few days then it goes to Ebay with a $450 opening bid. If anyone is interested then email me at gbarron@hiwheel.com or call me at 510-769-0980.

Greg

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          RE:FOR SALE:   Used 48 posted by Gary Kuhlmann on 7/21/2010 at 8:10:10 AM
Interested in buying your 48
DO YOU HAVE ANY PHOTOS?
Where are you located?

          RE:RE:FOR SALE:   Used 48 posted by chris Doyle on 8/16/2010 at 3:31:57 PM
I am interested in the 48"
You are in Alameda Ca Right?
CD

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