Author Topic: English Brakes side  (Read 366 times)

Paulo Fonseca

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English Brakes side
« on: March 26, 2015, 06:00:20 am »
Hi,

Could someone explain why some english bikes have the rear brake on the right hand and others on the left?

Paulo
« Last Edit: March 26, 2015, 06:06:34 am by Paulo Fonseca »

oldroads

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Re: English Brakes side
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2015, 06:21:34 am »
It seems to me the bikes built for the US market have the rear brake on the right side. 
The ones with the rear brake on the left were built for other markets.
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Paulo Fonseca

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Re: English Brakes side
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2015, 07:14:43 am »
It seems to me the bikes built for the US market have the rear brake on the right side. 
The ones with the rear brake on the left were built for other markets.
This bikes I'm talking about, all came from UK.


wtt11

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Re: English Brakes side
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2015, 04:45:27 pm »
Hi Paulo! I have the same question. My guess is that bicycles per 1930s mostly have right side rear brake but not always do. It varies for different brands but right side was mainstream. For example, right rear brakes are rarely used on most Raleigh bicycles but are frequently found on Humber, BSA, Triumph, Hercules and some off-brands in that period. This arrangement is related to nothing but supply chain?? Since Raleigh consistently use its own unique double sides brake joint lever(I don't know the terminology), it less likely changed over time. One thing I know is that Sturmey Archer continues providing right side brake system as 'standard part' in its catalog until 1940s, which indicts the likelihood of bicycle in that period still use right rear brake. Any other idea?

wtt11

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Re: English Brakes side
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2015, 04:51:47 pm »
year of 1948 from SA.  see the top right hand part

Paulo Fonseca

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Re: English Brakes side
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2015, 06:30:21 pm »
Hi,
I've made a quick search in the raleigh catalogues, and from1925 to 1938 the rear brake was on the right, in 1940 its on the left.

wtt11

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Re: English Brakes side
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2015, 10:18:43 pm »
I don't see it's on the right though. See: https://raleighbicycles.wordpress.com 
Most are at middle for roadster and left for racer? Can you provide some sheets of what you find? Thanks! BTW, I'm noticed that Rudge is on the right also.... But there is really no clue of such arrangement is implemented by rules you can tell....they are plausibly determined by designer's taste??

Paulo Fonseca

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Re: English Brakes side
« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2015, 01:24:03 am »
Please take a look in the catalogues from 25 to 40. The rod brakes  pictures are not very claer, but the other models with cable brakes are,  specially in the race models.
http://www.veterancycleclublibrary.org.uk/library/?action=search&items=16&searchtext=raleigh+catalogue&action.x=0&action.y=0&action=search

wtt11

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Re: English Brakes side
« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2015, 12:04:34 pm »
I always learn something here in this forum! Thank you Paulo! So my argument only hold true for rod brake but not for cable brake

boneman

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Re: English Brakes side
« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2015, 07:15:30 pm »
D'oh!  I was thinking sidepull brakes and their orientation at the wheel....

It is interesting that the "hands" of the brakes differ between rod brakes and cable brakes.  I would think... that you would want the front brake on the RH bar... just because the majority of people are right handed and that would be better for braking "force".

Later!

Larry "Boneman" Bone - That's the brakes!

Paulo Fonseca

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Re: English Brakes side
« Reply #10 on: March 28, 2015, 08:14:35 pm »
I'm not saying yhat the position of the brake it's diferent betwen rod and cable brakes.
what Im saying Is that my early bikes (20s 30s) have the rear brake on the right side of handle bar. We can alao see this on ghe ralwigh catalogues. Its better noticed on the cable brake models because we can see the cables better on the draw.

wtt11

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Re: English Brakes side
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2015, 12:30:17 am »
Cable brakes can swap to any side you want. So it's arbitrary indeed. Being noticed that customer is a left hand, dealer'll put rear cable brake to the left to better satisfy his or her own interest. However, rod brakes can never do so by customer preference.

DKB

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Re: English Brakes side
« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2015, 06:19:28 pm »
My 1970 DL-1 has its front brake on the right, unlike the photos above. I thought that was typical of rod-brake setups. Maybe the thinking was that a rider in England would signal with his right hand and slowing down can be safer with the rear brake. The same reasoning would put the front brake on the left in the new world. I've always changed my front brake to the right because I'm right-handed (better stopping) and because it's consistent with motorcycle practice.

Paulo Fonseca

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Re: English Brakes side
« Reply #13 on: March 31, 2015, 10:03:28 am »
My 1970 DL-1 has its front brake on the right, unlike the photos above. I thought that was typical of rod-brake setups. Maybe the thinking was that a rider in England would signal with his right hand and slowing down can be safer with the rear brake. The same reasoning would put the front brake on the left in the new world. I've always changed my front brake to the right because I'm right-handed (better stopping) and because it's consistent with motorcycle practice.
I understand why the rear brake is used on the left in UK, what I don't understand it's why many of my bikes that came from UK don't have the brakes that way.
Some catalogues from the 20s 30s have the brakes like my bikes (rear brake on the right), but this catalogues could be "export catalogues" and don't prove that the brakes were used this way in UK. But, having many bikes that came from UK with "rear brake on the right" makes me bellive they were.