Author Topic: Royal London  (Read 2011 times)

Curtis

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Royal London
« on: November 13, 2011, 02:06:17 pm »
Royal London


Here's a recently acquired Royal London.  I'm still unsure of a year, though..I took this picture with an old phone with a scratchy lens, but if anyone's interested, I'll get some cleaner pics up..


Cloudy days, and dusty bikes

alwaysride

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Re: Royal London
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2011, 02:20:53 pm »
Looks nice.  Rod brakes? 
Seeing the reflectors on it makes me think it is a 'rider'?
Always buying.  Always riding.

Curtis

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Re: Royal London
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2011, 02:30:56 pm »
Looks nice.  Rod brakes? 
Seeing the reflectors on it makes me think it is a 'rider'?
Thanks.  Daily rider, yes.
Rod brakes, rear chain adjusters similar to motorcycles, 26" Dunlop wheels, neat little top tube shifter for <L><N><H>..

SA hub has absolutely no date or model stamps..which I find a bit frustrating..What does it mean?


I've picked up Boneman's habit over the years:
Smooth, easy, and straight, the way we roll

Curtis

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Re: Royal London
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2011, 04:00:52 pm »
Makes and Models
These may be split into individual topics by using the "Split Topic" button above.
Hi oldroads, I assume you're the administrator/moderator of this here fine forum..Firstly, I want to say a HUGE thanks for all the work you've done to bring about the forum change..It's really a massive improvement and I'm sure it's taken considerable effort.

Secondly, I couldn't find the <split topic> button you mentioned up there, I believe that's an administrator option only,  so I just created a new topic.  Please inform us of protocols for future use here.  Have you considered creating a <Information and Use> category with stickies laying out the rules and methods of use of this board?

~Curtis,  Trying to help, and trying not to step on toes
« Last Edit: November 13, 2011, 04:16:27 pm by Curtis »

oldroads

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Re: Royal London
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2011, 06:23:06 pm »
Your feedback is appreciated, Curtis, and my toes have been so flattened over the past 5 decades I can never be offended.  But thank you for your consideration.

That ?Split a Topic? button may only exist in a Moderator or Administrator?s world.  I?ll look into that.

In the meantime I?ll set up a ?How this forum works? sticky. 

I do want people to know they can start a topic as they choose.

-Vin
Menotomy Vintage Bicycles at OldRoads.com

Keith Body

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Re: Royal London
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2011, 04:59:27 pm »
Plenty of info on SA gears. If the gear selector is original, it points to about 1938, when the AW gear was introduced. This has the toggle chain control going into the rear axle with no indicator on the left, whereas the previous K type went right through the axle. Roadster parts were pretty standard between makes, but some detail pics could help. There is usually some identity on the rear hub shell.
Keith

oldroads

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Re: Royal London
« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2011, 05:26:17 pm »
Excellent call, Keith.
We all appreciate you sharing your years of experience. You've helped a lot of riders identify their cycles and get them on the road.
This is in response to this thread, and the many others today and over the past few years.
-Vin
Menotomy Vintage Bicycles at OldRoads.com

Keith Body

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Re: Royal London
« Reply #7 on: November 19, 2011, 01:30:34 pm »
Vin, This new site will make it a lot easier for all posters to track the responses. Glad to help, but I hope Curtis can give us some close up pictures. This looks like a UK bike, as 26" wheels were outselling 28's by the late '30's. Could be a big store own name.
It  is often claimed that the AW was introduced in 1936, but the K type was still in all the 1937 catalogues. I think the AW was widely sold fairly late in 1937.
The 26" wheel bikes, mainly fully brazed, were taking over from the 28's by 1938 in the UK. Some due to the increase in city traffic, with the 26" wheel the bottom bracket was 1.5 inches lower, so the rider could stop on the saddle with one foot on the ground, whereas on a 28" the 24" frames were too large for most people, and they dismounted to stop. They started with one foot on a pedal and pushed off with the other (like a scooter) then lifted the leg over the saddle. More difficult in traffic.
Thanks for your favourable comments.
Keith

Curtis

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Re: Royal London
« Reply #8 on: November 23, 2011, 03:44:09 pm »
Plenty of info on SA gears. If the gear selector is original, it points to about 1938, when the AW gear was introduced. This has the toggle chain control going into the rear axle with no indicator on the left, whereas the previous K type went right through the axle. Roadster parts were pretty standard between makes, but some detail pics could help. There is usually some identity on the rear hub shell.
Keith
Pleased to see some interest.. Keith, I always have found your posts to be interesting and helpful.
Here's a few pics of rear AW hub, one from the left and one from the right:

Blind hole on the left side.

This is the first hub I've encountered where there is no date stamp..After extended periods of looking with various lights and many wipes, there is Nothing there!

It's somewhat difficult to determine if the gear selector is original, as I see no wear marks on the paint to suggest there was ever something different there, and additionally, there are no wear marks on the handlebars suggesting one was ever mounted there..

Still looking, still searching

Keith Body

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Re: Royal London
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2011, 05:40:58 pm »
Curtis, It certainly looks late 1930's to me. The standard roadster bikes were sold for commuters, cheaper to run than wearing out shoe leather. Mostly never maintained, but used in frequently wet conditions. In the mid to late 30's my home town created a social housing estate for about 50,000 people, who were moved mostly about 4 miles from where they worked, but out into cleanish air.
This was "slum clearance".
Let me explain why these are not my favourite bikes. In 1954 I could be paid 2 shillings ( ?0.10 or 10 pence) for fitting a back tyre. Same if it had a chaincase. We used to drop the rear brakes out of the guides by tapping the guides towards the rear with a small hammer, the screws were unlikely to turn.
Top tube in the stand, and remove the rear wheel nuts to get the mudguard stays off. Compare this with a forward facing dropout with mudguard eyes, and cable brakes. Never needed tyre levers.
When fitting an inner tube only we used to run our fingers round the inside of the tyre in case anything sharp was sticking through.
Not really much further help for your bike.
Keith